neighbor

The Greek that is translated as “neighbor” in English is rendered into Babatana as “different man,” i.e. someone who is not one of your relatives. (Source: David Clark)

In North Alaskan Inupiatun, it is rendered as “a person outside of your building,” in Tzeltal as “your back and side” (implying position of the dwellings), in Indonesian and in Tae’ as “your fellow-man,” in Toraja-Sa’dan it is “your fellow earth-dweller,” in Shona (translation of 1966) as “another person like you,” in Kekchí “younger-brother-older-brother” (a compound which means all one’s neighbors in a community) (sources: Bratcher / Nida and Reiling / Swellengrebel), in Mairasi “your people” (source: Enggavoter 2004), in Mezquital Otomi as “fellow being,” in Tzeltal as “companion,” in Isthmus Zapotec as “another,” and in Teutila Cuicatec as “all people” (source: Waterhouse / Parrott in Notes on Translation October 1967, p. 1ff.).

In Matt 19:19, Matt 22:39, Mark 12:31, Mark 12:33, Luke 10:27, Luke 10:29 it is translated into Ixcatlán Mazatec with a term that refers to a person who is socially/physically near. Ixcatlán Mazatec also has a another term for “neighbor” that means “fellow humans-outsiders” which was not chosen for these passages. (Source: Robert Bascom)

In Nyongar it is translated as moorta-boordak or “people nearby” (source: Warda-Kwabba Luke-Ang).

love your neighbor as yourself

The Greek and Hebrew that is translated in English as “love your neighbor as yourself” is translated in Shilluk, Anuak, and Nuer as “love your neighbors as yourselves.” In those and other languages a plural form has to be used if it is to be applied to more than one person where in English a singular can stand for many (compare everyone, each, whoever, any). (Source: Larson 1998, p. 42)

See also he who / whoever and neighbor.

complete verse (Matthew 19:19)

Following are a number of back-translations of Matthew 19:19:

  • Uma: “we (incl.) must honor our mother and father, and love our (incl.) companions like we (incl.) love ourselves.'” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “honor your mother-father; and you shall love your companion as you love yourself.'” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “respect your father and your mother; and treat well your companion; think of him as you would your own breath.'” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “respect/honor your (sing.) father and your (sing.) mother, and love your (sing.) companions like your (sing.) love for yourself (sing.),’ said Jesus answering.” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “Honor your father and your mother, and value your fellowman just like your valuing of your own body.'” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)
  • Tenango Otomi: “Honor your father, honor your mother.” (Source: Tenango Otomi Back Translation)