scribe

The Greek that is translated as “scribe” in English “were more than mere writers of the law. They were the trained interpreters of the law and expounders of tradition.”

Here are a number of its (back-) translations:

  • Yaka: “clerks in God’s house”
  • Amganad Ifugao: “men who wrote and taught in the synagogue”
  • Navajo: “teaching-writers” (“an attempt to emphasize their dual function”)
  • Shipibo-Conibo: “book-wise persons”
  • San Blas Kuna: “those who knew the Jews’ ways”
  • Loma: “the educated ones”
  • San Mateo del Mar Huave: “those knowing holy paper”
  • Central Mazahua: “writers of holy words”
  • Indonesian: “experts in the Torah”
  • Pamona: “men skilled in the ordinances” (source for this and all above: Bratcher / Nida)
  • Sinhala: “bearer-of-the-law”
  • Marathi: “one-learned-in-the-Scriptures”
  • Shona (1966): “expert of the law”
  • Balinese: “expert of the books of Torah”
  • Ekari: “one knowing paper/book”
  • Tboli: “one who taught the law God before caused Moses to write” (or “one who taught the law of Moses”) (source for this and 5 above: Reiling / Swellengrebel)
  • Mairasi: people who write and explain Great Above One’s (=God’s) prohibitions” (source: Enggavoter 2004)
  • Nyanja: “teachers of Laws” (source: Ernst Wendland)
  • North Alaskan Inupiatun: “teachers of law”
  • Huehuetla Tepehua: “writer”
  • Yatzachi Zapotec: “person who teaches the law which Moses wrote”
  • Alekano: “man who knows wisdom” (source for this and four above: M. Larson / B. Moore in Notes on Translation February 1970, p. 1-125.)
  • Saint Lucian Creole French: titcha lwa sé Jwif-la (“teacher of the law of the Jews”) (source: David Frank in Lexical Challenges in the St. Lucian Creole Bible Translation Project, 1998
  • Chichimeca-Jonaz: “scribes the ones who teach the holy writings”
  • Atatláhuca Mixtec: “teachers of the words of the law”
  • Coatlán Mixe: “teachers of the religious law”
  • Lalana Chinantec: “people who are teachers of the law which God gave to Moses back then”
  • Tepeuxila Cuicatec: “the men that know well the law” (Source for this and four above: Viola Waterhouse in Notes on Translation August 1966, p. 86ff.)
  • Huixtán Tzotzil: “one who mistakenly thought he was teaching God’s commandments”(Huixtán Tzotzil frequently uses the verb -cuy to express “to mistakenly think something” from the point of view of the speaker; source: Marion M. Cowan in Notes on Translation 20/1966, pp. 6ff.)