in the house

The Greek that is translated as “in the house” in English is translated in El Nayar Cora as “in his house” and in Choapan Zapotec as “the house that they entered when they first came to Capernaum.” (Source: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)

See also at home.

become one flesh

The Greek and Hebrew that is often translated into English as “(the two) shall become one flesh” is translated as “become just one” in Copainalá Zoque and San Mateo del Mar Huave or with existing idiomatic equivalents such as “become one blood” in Mitla Zapotec, “become the complement of each other’s spirit” in Tzeltal (source for this and above Bratcher / Nida), “become one body” in Uab Meto (source: P. Middelkoop in The Bible Translator 1952, p. 208ff.), or “tie with wife as one, so that they tie one insides” in Luang (source: Kathy and Mark Taber in Kroneman (2004), p. 539).

In Tataltepec Chatino it is translated as “the two shall accompany each other so that they no longer seem two but are like one person,” in Choapan Zapotec as “when the man and woman live together in front of God, it is as if just one person,” and in Mezquital Otomi as “they aren’t two, it is as though they are one.” (Source: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)

See also I am your bone and flesh.

whoever wants to be first must be last of all and servant of all

The Greek that is translated as “whoever wants to be first must be last of all and servant of all” or similar in English is translated in Tzotzil as “If anyone wants to be thought of as the most important, let him humble himself, let him help all people,” in Chuj as “If there is one man wants to lift up himself among you, he must make himself lowly before you. He must enter as the servant of you all, he said,” and in Choapan Zapotec as “If a person wants to command his fellow-men, he must consider himself to be as a person who has no authority, let him work without pay for anyone.” (Source: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)

See also complete verse (Mark 9:35).

untie sandals

The Greek that is translated as “(not worthy to) untie sandals” or similar in English is translated in Awa as “because he is an important one, when he speaks I will be silent” since “the Jewish idea of not being worthy of even removing the sandals of an important person is foreign to Papua New Guinea.”

Other languages express it this way: “I am not worthy to be his servant” (Yatzachi Zapotec), “if unworthy I should even carry his burden, it would not be right” (Alekano), or “I don’t compare with him” (Tenango Otomi). (Source: M. Larson / B. Moore in Notes on Translation February 1970, p. 1-125.)

In Ayutla Mixtec it is translated as “I am too unworthy to perform even the lowliest of tasks for him” to avoid the wrong meaning of playing a trick by tying the sandals. In Choapan Zapotec the metaphor of the shoelaces is completely replaced by a similar one from the local culture: “I am not even important to carry his pack.” (Source for this and above: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)

dug a pit for the wine press

The Greek that is translated as “dug a pit for the wine press” or similar in English is translated in Choapan Zapotec as “positioned a flat rock where he could squeeze out grape juice.” (Source: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)

complete verse (Mark 8:28)

Following are a number of back-translations of Mark 8:28:

  • Uma: “They said to him: ‘There are some who say you are Yohanes the Baptizer come back to life. There are also some who say you are the prophet Elia. There are also some who say you are a prophet of long ago who has come back to life. ‘” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “They answered, they said, ‘There are people who say that you are ko’ Yahiya who bathed people being alive again. Others also say that you are ko’ Nabi Eliyas. And there are also some who say that you are ko’ one of the prophets of old.'” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “And they answered, they said, ‘There are some who say that you are John the Baptist raised from the dead, and some say that you are ancient Elijah, – and others say that you are one of the ancient prophets of God.'” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “‘Some say that you (sing.) are Juan the Baptizer. Others say that you (sing.) are Elias, and others also say that you (sing.) are one of the prophets of long-ago,’ they answered.” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “His disciples replied, saying, ‘Some say you are Juan who was baptizing. Well as for others, they say you are Prophet Elias. Well there are those too who say you are one of the prophets of the past who has come alive again.'” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)
  • Choapan Zapotec: “… ‘Some say, John the Baptist, who lives again, and others say that you are Elijah who lives again, and others say that you are a man who preached God’s word a long time ago who lives again.” (Source: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)

complete verse (Mark 9:42)

Following are a number of back-translations of Mark 9:42:

  • Uma: “‘But who[ever] causes one small child like this child to fall with the result that they no longer believe in me, God’s punishment on that person will indeed be big. It would be far better for a big sharpening stone to be fastened to his neck and him be thrown into the sea.” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “‘But whoever causes-to-sin one little child like this that believes in me, it would have been better for him to have a big stone hung around his neck and be thrown into the sea, just so that he would not be able to influence to sin.” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “But if there is a person who by means of him, one of these children is successfully tempted, it is better for that person if a large grindstone is tied to his neck and he is thrown into the middle of the sea rather than through him one of these children is successfully tempted.” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “‘Whoever tempts so-that even one of these lowest people who believe in me will sin, it would be better if his neck were tied-to with a heavy stone and then he were thrown into the ocean than his continuing-with his temptation.” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “But well, whoever will cause to fall (into sin, fig.) a humble one like this child who believes in me, it would really be better if he were just weighted with a large milling stone and just dropped into the middle of the ocean. (That would be) better than that he would go through with such big evil.” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)
  • Choapan Zapotec: “‘If people want to direct children who believe in me to not follow me anymore, there would be less penalty for them if, before they do what they want, people were to tie heavy grindstones around their necks and throw them into a river.'” (Source: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)

complete verse (Mark 10:31)

Following are a number of back-translations of Mark 10:31:

  • Uma: “But many people who have big lives at this time will have small lives in the future. And many also who have small lives at this time will have big lives in the future.'” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “Many who are ahead now, will be behind in the future and many who are behind now, will be ahead in the future.'” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “There are many people today who seem to have high status, but in the future, their status will be very small. And there are many people today whose status is very small, but in the future, their status will be high,’ he said.” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “But many who are high/great nowadays will be brought-low, and also many of the low nowadays will be made-high/great.'” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “But the truth is, there are many who are great/important today in man’s opinion who will become insignificant/low-class when that day comes. And they are many today who are only insignificant/low-class in man’s opinion who will become great/important in the kingdom of God.'” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)
  • Choapan Zapotec: “Some people rule the days they walk on earth. When they arrive where God is they will no longer rule. Some people don’t rule the days they walk on earth. When they arrive where God is they will rule.”
  • Tlahuitoltepec Mixe: “Many whom people think are important, desirable, God is going to make small, and he will better cause to come out pretty those whom people think are not important or desirable.” (Source for this and one above: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)

complete verse (Mark 12:39)

Following are a number of back-translations of Mark 12:39:

  • Uma: “They are happy to be seated in the honorable seats in the prayer houses. They are happy if they are seated in the good seats in the feasts.” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “If in the prayer-house, they want to sit in the seat for the respected people. Likewise if they are at a feast, their wish is to sit in the most prominent seat.” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “And when they are in the church, they want that they are the oens to be seated in the seats of high people. And they also want that they are greatly respected when they attend feasts.” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “They also choose the best seats in the sinagoga (synagogue), and when they go to join-in-eating, it has to be the important people that they go and sit-with.” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “And their favorite seats in the worship-place are the seats where important people are seated. It’s like that too at feasts.” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)
  • Choapan Zapotec: “Also they want to sit where the respected people sit in the synagogue. Also when there is a fiesta, they want to eat first.” (Source: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)

complete verse (Mark 14:24)

Following are a number of back-translations of Mark 14:24:

  • Uma: “He said to them: ‘This is my blood that will be spilled when I die to redeem / take-the-place-of many people. This blood of mine strengthens the promise that connects God with mankind.” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “Isa said to them, ‘This is my blood which will soon be poured out because of/on behalf of many people. This is a sign that God is fulfilling/will fulfill his covenant.” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “And Jesus said, ‘This is my blood which will be shed when I am killed in order to annoint many people. This is the sign of the way of setting free which God has established.” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “Jesus said, ‘This is my blood that ratifies (lit. ties-in-a-knot) God’s new agreement. It will flow-out when I die for the many people.” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “‘That,’ said Jesus, ‘that is my blood which is the strength/pledge of the initiated-agreement of God with people. For I will shed (lit. cause to drip) my blood so that many can be forgiven.” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)
  • Choapan Zapotec: “… This is my blood which I will shed in order that you will know God has entered into an agreement with mankind. Also in order that he might forgive the sins of mankind.”
  • Southern Puebla Mixtec: “… This is my blood. It is going to run out for many people. By my blood God makes a new agreement with people.”
  • Isthmus Mixe: “… his is my blood which will run out in behalf of many people, this is a sign that God has made a new agreement with you.”
  • Peñoles Mixtec: “… This is my blood which is for a contract God spoke for all people. My blood will be spilled and for this reason people will find salvation.”
  • Tewa: “… This is my blood. I will spill my blood for many people, and because I do this, what God has promised will come to pass.” (Source for this and four above: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)

complete verse (Matthew 19:30)

Following are a number of back-translations of Matthew 19:30:

  • Uma: “But many people who are important [lit., whose lives are big] at this time will become unimportant [lit., their lives are small] in the future. And many also the people who are unimportant [lit., small their lives] at this time will become important [lit., big their lives] in the future.'” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “But many who are first now will be last in the future, and many who are last now will be first in the future.'” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “But many are the people today who seem to be big in rank, but their rank will be very small in the future. And many also are the people today who are very low in rank but in the future they will be very high in rank,’ he said.” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “But many who are high/great now will be made-low/humble, and also many who are low/humble now will be made-high/great.'” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “But it’s true that many are important today in man’s opinion who will become low-class/insignificant when that day comes. And many are only low-class/insignificant today in man’s opinion, but they will become important in the kingdom of God.'” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)
  • Tenango Otomi: “Many people are respected here, but on that day very little will they be respected. Many people are not respected here, but on that day they will be respected.” (Source: Tenango Otomi Back Translation)
  • Choapan Zapotec: “Some people rule the days they walk on earth. When they arrive where God is they will no longer rule. Some people don’t rule the days they walk on earth. When they arrive where God is they will rule.”
  • Tlahuitoltepec Mixe: “Many whom people think are important, desirable, God is going to make small, and he will better cause to come out pretty those whom people think are not important or desirable.” (Source for this and one above: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)

complete verse (Matthew 23:6)

Following are a number of back-translations of Matthew 23:6:

  • Uma: “They are happy to be made to sit in the honored seats in the houses of prayer.” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “When they are at feasts, they want to sit in the most honored place/seat. In the prayer-house they want to sit in the places of the honored people.” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “What they want is that they will be greatly honored when they attend gatherings. And when they are in the worship place, they want that they’ll be the ones asked to sit in the seats where the people high in rank sit.” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “When they go to join-in-eating, they choose the important people to sit-with, and they also choose the best seats in the synagogue.” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “Their favorite seats at feasts are the seats where important people are seated. It’s like that too in the worship-place.” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)
  • Tenango Otomi: “There where people have feasts and also in the church they hunt out the chairs which are good and sit there.” (Source: Tenango Otomi Back Translation)
  • Choapan Zapotec: “Also they want to sit where the respected people sit in the synagogue. Also when there is a fiesta, they want to eat first.” (Source: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)