motion (to speak)

The Greek that is translated as “motion (to speak)” or “make a sign (to speak)” in English is translated Isthmus Mixe translated as “winked with both eye” (source: Ronald D. Olson in Notes on Translation January, 1968, p. 15ff.).

See also motion to.

praise (God)

The Greek and Hebrew that is translated as “praise (God)” in English is translated in a nuymber of ways:

In Dan a figurative expression for praising God is used: “pushing God’s horse.” “In the distant past people closely followed the horses ridden by chiefs, so ‘pushing’ them.” (Source: Don Slager)

Sovereign Lord

The Greek that is translated in English as “Sovereign Lord” is translated as “you who are Chief, you own all of us, truly you are God” in Chichimeca-Jonaz, as “Big Father, you are God” in Isthmus Mixe, as “my Lord who is the greatest” in Lalana Chinantec, as “our Lord, he who is greatest before us” in Ayutla Mixtec, as “you, Lord God, who is very great” in Tepeuxila Cuicatec, as “you, the Lord able to do all things” in Xicotepec De Juárez Totonac, or “God our Father, you are our Boss, the biggest” Tataltepec Chatino. (Source: Viola Waterhouse in Notes on Translation August 1966, p. 86ff.)

right hand of

The Greek and Hebrew that is typically translated as “(to the) right hand of” is often translated much more descriptively in other languages. In Yakan it is translated as “at the right side, here in the greatest/most important/most honored place/seat,” in Mezquital Otomi as “the right hand, at the place of honor,” in Chuj as “exalted at the right hand,” in Chichimeca-Jonaz as “in a high place there at the right,” in Lalana Chinantec as “make great,” in Isthmus Mixe as “given great authority,” in Morelos Nahuatl as “placed big,” in Isthmus Mixe as “stays with me,” in Morelos Nahuatl as “heart-strengthens me” (source: Viola Waterhouse in Notes on Translation August, 1966, p. 86ff), and in Teutila Cuicatec as “in all authority at the right side” (source: Ronald D. Olson in Notes on Translation January, 1968, p. 15ff.).

In Lamnso’, the seat on the right-hand side signifies that the person seated there would have a higher position than the one to his left (vs. just being a seat of honor). To circumvent any misunderstanding of the biblical text, the translation here refers to the “highest seat next to God.” (Source: Karl Grebe in Holzhausen 1991, p. 52)

glutton

The Greek that is often translates as “glutton” in English is translated as “a very otter” in Isthmus Mixe.

See also glutton.

everything they owned was held in common

The Greek that is translated as “everything they owned was held in common” or similar in English is translated as “no one said, ‘This is mine.’ They owned everything together” in Isthmus Mixe, as “not one of them considered their things apart, because they considered their things as if they belonged to all of them” in Teutila Cuicatec, as “there was no person who said that one thing was his alone. But everything of theirs one only its thusness by them all” in Chuj. (Source: Viola Waterhouse in Notes on Translation August 1966, p. 86ff.)

council

The Greek that is translated as “council” or “Council” in English is (back-) translated in a variety of ways:

son of encouragement

The Greek that is translated as “son of encouragement” in English is translated as “one who makes people receive a helpful word” in Ojitlán Chinantec, “the person who makes our hearts be at peace” in Lalana Chinantec, “he will encourage us” in Isthmus Mixe, “one who enlarges (encourages) hearts” in Chichimeca-Jonaz, “one who comforts” in San Mateo del Mar Huave, “one who consoles people” in Tzotzil, and “gives gladness to those who weep” in Desano. (Source: Viola Waterhouse in Notes on Translation August 1966, p. 86ff.)

saint

The Greek that is translated as “saint” in English is rendered into Highland Puebla Nahuatl as “those with clean hearts,” into Northwestern Dinka as “those with white hearts,” and into Western Kanjobal as “people of prayer.” (Source: Nida 1952, p. 146)

Other translations include:

  • Ixcatlán Mazatec: “followers of Jesus” (source: Robert Bascom)
  • Tzeltal: “whom God possesses”
  • Highland Totonac: “children of God”
  • Yatzachi Zapotec: “clean-hearted people” (source for this and two above: Waterhouse / Parrott in Notes on Translation October 1967, p. 1ff.)
  • Garifuna: “people consecrated to God”
  • Isthmus Mixe: “the ones who believe God’s words”
  • Ayutla Mixtec: “those of God’s”
  • Tepeuxila Cuicatec: “people God has cleansed” (source for this and three above: Viola Waterhouse in Notes on Translation August 1966, p. 86ff.)

census

The Greek and Hebrew that is typically translated as “census” in English is translated in these ways:

full of grace

The Greek that is typically translated as “full of grace” in English is translated in the following ways: