rudder

The Greek that is translated as “(small) rudder” in English is translated in Yatzachi Zapotec as “(a small) stick,” in Mezquital Otomi as “a (little) metal,” in Rincón Zapotec as “(little) wooden hand” (source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.), and in Tetelcingo Nahuatl as “board to steer” (source: Ronald D. Olson in Notes on Translation January, 1968, p. 15ff.).

See also ship and anchor.

riches have rotted

The Greek that is translated as “your riches have rotted” or similar in English is translated in Guhu-Samane as “your riches stink” (source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.).

every species of beast and bird and of reptile and sea creature

The Greek that is translated as “every species of beast and bird, of reptile and sea creature” in English is translated in Rincón Zapotec as “every animal of the field which walks on the earth, and every winged animal and the snakes dragging their stomachs on the earth and also every animal in the sea.” (Source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.)

See also birds or four-footed animals or reptiles.

elders of the church

The Greek that is typically translated as “the elders of the church” in English is translated as “the old men who believe” in Sayula Popoluca, “those who care for the assembly of Christ” in Rincón Zapotec, “those in authority among the brothers” in Central Mazahua, and “the supervisors of the creed” in Guhu-Samane (source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.).

See also elder.

anyone who has committed sin will be forgiven

The Greek that is translated as “anyone who has committed sin will be forgiven” or similar in English is translated as “if there is his sin the one who is healed his sin will be lost also” in Tzotzil, “that sick one has been healed, his sins the Father has pardoned” in Mezquital Otomi), and “and if sins are the cause of our sickness, it will be forgiven us” in Eastern Highland Otomi) (source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.).

endurance

The Greek that is translated in English as “endurance” (or “patience”or “perseverance”) is translated in Tzotzil as “(good) strength of heart(s).”

(Source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.)

slow to speak

The Greek that is translated as “slow to speak” in English is translated as “speak without thinking” in Yatzachi Zapotec.

(Source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.)

Can a fig tree yield olives or a grapevine figs?

The Greek that is translated as “Can a fig tree yield olives or a grapevine figs?” in English is translated as “What about orange trees? Can also guaves hang there? Or what about a blackberry bush? Do oranges hang there?” in Eastern Highland Otomi and “Think also if an apple tree can give peaches, if an avocado tree can give apples” in Tzotzil) (source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.).

but ask in faith never doubting

The Greek that is translated as “but ask in faith, never doubting” or “but ask him without doubting” or similar in English is translated as “but when we ask Him to teach us, we must believe that He is listening-obeying us and we must not doubt” in Yatzachi Zapotec and as “but we must think one thing when we sincerely ask for understanding, and not think he won’t give it to us, we’ll think we will be given understanding” in Eastern Highland Otomi. (Source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.)

See also doubt.