but ask in faith never doubting

The Greek that is translated as “but ask in faith, never doubting” or “but ask him without doubting” or similar in English is translated as “but when we ask Him to teach us, we must believe that He is listening-obeying us and we must not doubt” in Yatzachi Zapotec and as “but we must think one thing when we sincerely ask for understanding, and not think he won’t give it to us, we’ll think we will be given understanding” in Eastern Highland Otomi. (Source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.)

See also doubt.

peaceable

The Greek that is typically translated as “peaceable” in English is translated in a variety of ways:

(Source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.).

See also peace (absence of conflict).

one is tempted by one’s own desire

The Greek that is translated as “one is tempted by one’s own desire” or similar is translated in Sayula Popoluca as “Because every man is tempted when his heart begs him to do evil, and that evil pulls at our hearts.” (Source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.)

impartial

The Greek that is translated as “impartial” in English is translated as “not changeable” in Mezquital Otomi), “never go back on one’s word” in Eastern Highland Otomi, “in just one way one judges” in Rincón Zapotec), “to treat all companions the same” in Yatzachi Zapotec and “love people equally” in Central Mazahua.

(Source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.).

See also judge impartially.

the Father of lights with whom there is no variation or shadow due to change

The Greek that is translated as §the Father of lights, with whom there is no variation or shadow due to change” or similar in English is translated in the following ways ion other languages:

  • Tzotzil: “the lights, their shiningness changes; their light can be shaded. Not thus our Father God.”
  • Eastern Highland Otomi: “But God isn’t like the lights he made, sometimes they lack light when there is a turning.”
  • Central Mazahua: “But he doesn’t change his thinking like those things that are in heaven change their road. He is always the same gracious person.”

(Source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.)

justification, justify

The Greek that is translated as “justify” in English is translated into Tzotzil in two different ways. One of those is with Lec xij’ilatotic yu’un Dios ta sventa ti ta xc’ot ta o’ntonal ta xch’unel ti Jesucristoe (“we are seen well by God because of our faith in Jesus Christ”) (source: Aeilts, p. 118) and the other is “God sees as righteous” (source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.).

Other (back-) translations include:

the perfect law - the law of liberty

The Greek that is translated as “the perfect law, the law of liberty” or similar in English is translated in Central Mazahua as “God has set us free so that we are able to obey his word,” in Rincón Zapotec as “the law of God which is perfect and is able to cause us to be saved,” in Mezquital Otomi as “God’s new word frees us in order that our life will be good,” and in Eastern Highland Otomi as “the new word which is like a law strengthens our hearts so that with pleasure we will obey it.”

(Source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.)

humble yourselves before the Lord

The Greek that is translated as “humble yourselves before the Lord” or similar in English is translated as “bow before God’s face” in Eastern Highland Otomi), “remain low before his countenance” in Alekano, and “acknowledge that you are not worth anything” in Central Mazahua (source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.).

See also humble / lowly and humble (mind).

mercy

(To view the different translations of this term in a simplified graphical form on a new page, click or tap here.)

The Greek terms that are typically translated as “mercy” (or “compassion”) in English are translated in various ways. Bratcher / Nida classify them in (1) those based on the quality of heart, or other psychological center, (2) those which introduce the concept of weeping or extreme sorrow, (3) those which involve willingness to look upon and recognize the condition of others, or (4) those which involve a variety of intense feelings.

Here are some (back-) translations: