curse

The Greek that is translated as “curse” in English” is translated as “with our mouth we blaspheme (our fellowmen)” in Mezquital Otomi), as “speak evil of” in Sayula Popoluca, and as “ask for a calamity for” in Eastern Highland Otomi (source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.).

See also cursed and I will bless those who bless you, and the one who curses you I will curse.

that you may be mature and complete

The Greek that is translated as “that you may be mature and complete” or similar in English is translated in Alekano as “your life will become whole,” in Rincón Zapotec as “finish becoming perfect,” and in Eastern Highland Otomi as “that is what will cause our hearts to be mature.”

(Source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.)

fresh water and bitter water

The Greek that is translated into English as “fresh water and bitter (or: brackish) water” is translated into Yatzachi Zapotec as “sweet water and hard water” and in Mezquital Otomi as “clean water and water that is bitter” (source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.).

but ask in faith never doubting

The Greek that is translated as “but ask in faith, never doubting” or “but ask him without doubting” or similar in English is translated as “but when we ask Him to teach us, we must believe that He is listening-obeying us and we must not doubt” in Yatzachi Zapotec and as “but we must think one thing when we sincerely ask for understanding, and not think he won’t give it to us, we’ll think we will be given understanding” in Eastern Highland Otomi. (Source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.)

See also doubt.

Can a fig tree yield olives or a grapevine figs?

The Greek that is translated as “Can a fig tree yield olives or a grapevine figs?” in English is translated as “What about orange trees? Can also guaves hang there? Or what about a blackberry bush? Do oranges hang there?” in Eastern Highland Otomi and “Think also if an apple tree can give peaches, if an avocado tree can give apples” in Tzotzil) (source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.).

elders of the church

The Greek that is typically translated as “the elders of the church” in English is translated as “the old men who believe” in Sayula Popoluca, “those who care for the assembly of Christ” in Rincón Zapotec, “those in authority among the brothers” in Central Mazahua, and “the supervisors of the creed” in Guhu-Samane (source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.).

See also elder.

one is tempted by one’s own desire

The Greek that is translated as “one is tempted by one’s own desire” or similar is translated in Sayula Popoluca as “Because every man is tempted when his heart begs him to do evil, and that evil pulls at our hearts.” (Source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.)

complete verse (James 3:13)

Below are some back-translations of James 3:13:

  • Central Mazahua: “When anyone of you knows what is good to do and knows how, he will be careful how he will live and he will not make himself great. In that way people will notice that truly that one knows.”
  • Rincón Zapotec: “If there is among you a man who has great ability and he understands exceedingly, with complete humility he ought to show that he is thus by means of the good things he is doing.”
  • Alekano: ” . . . if he remains humble and does good things, he will demonstrate the substance of his wisdom.”

(Source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.).

anyone who has committed sin will be forgiven

The Greek that is translated as “anyone who has committed sin will be forgiven” or similar in English is translated as “if there is his sin the one who is healed his sin will be lost also” in Tzotzil, “that sick one has been healed, his sins the Father has pardoned” in Mezquital Otomi), and “and if sins are the cause of our sickness, it will be forgiven us” in Eastern Highland Otomi) (source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.).

complete verse (James 1:15)

Following are some back-translations of James 1:15:

  • Guhu-Samane: “Then it overwhelms the man and the sin becomes reality, and in return the man encounters death.”
  • Tzotzil: “If we let the coveting of our hearts grab its strength, thus we will seek our sin; if sin has grabbed its strength, we will be lost because of it.”
  • Yatzachi Zapotec: “If we obey our evil hearts, we are doing evil; and if we continue doing evil the day will come when God will desert us.”
  • Sayula Popoluca: “”When that evil he wants stays in him, it gives room for sin to grow in him, and that sin when it grows big, then it kills him.”

(Source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.)

peaceable

The Greek that is typically translated as “peaceable” in English is translated in a variety of ways:

(Source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.).

See also peace (absence of conflict).