the perfect law - the law of liberty

The Greek that is translated as “the perfect law, the law of liberty” or similar in English is translated in Central Mazahua as “God has set us free so that we are able to obey his word,” in Rincón Zapotec as “the law of God which is perfect and is able to cause us to be saved,” in Mezquital Otomi as “God’s new word frees us in order that our life will be good,” and in Eastern Highland Otomi as “the new word which is like a law strengthens our hearts so that with pleasure we will obey it.”

(Source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.)

every species of beast and bird and of reptile and sea creature

The Greek that is translated as “every species of beast and bird, of reptile and sea creature” in English is translated in Rincón Zapotec as “every animal of the field which walks on the earth, and every winged animal and the snakes dragging their stomachs on the earth and also every animal in the sea.” (Source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.)

See also birds or four-footed animals or reptiles.

complete verse (James 3:13)

Below are some back-translations of James 3:13:

  • Central Mazahua: “When anyone of you knows what is good to do and knows how, he will be careful how he will live and he will not make himself great. In that way people will notice that truly that one knows.”
  • Rincón Zapotec: “If there is among you a man who has great ability and he understands exceedingly, with complete humility he ought to show that he is thus by means of the good things he is doing.”
  • Alekano: ” . . . if he remains humble and does good things, he will demonstrate the substance of his wisdom.”

(Source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.).

complete verse (James 3:18)

Following are some back-translations of James 3:18:

  • Rincón Zapotec “And those who endeavor to set in quietness the things that happen, they live peaceably in order that all of them may be righteous.”
  • Yatzachi Zapotec: “If we make peace among our companions, then we will be at peace and will continually do good.”
  • Eastern Highland Otomi: “And when we considerately reconcile our fellow men, it is as if we sowed seed that multiplies well more deeds that are good.”

(Source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.).

justification, justify

The Greek that is translated as “justify” in English is translated into Tzotzil in two different ways. One of those is with Lec xij’ilatotic yu’un Dios ta sventa ti ta xc’ot ta o’ntonal ta xch’unel ti Jesucristoe (“we are seen well by God because of our faith in Jesus Christ”) (source: Aeilts, p. 118) and the other is “God sees as righteous” (source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.).

Other (back-) translations include:

  • Bilua: “straigthened” (Rom 3:20: “Nobody can be straightened in God’s presence…” (source: Carl Gross) (see also: righteous)
  • Western Highland Purepecha: “he sees him with the goodness of his Son” (“justification”)
  • Highland Puebla Nahuatl: “heart-straightening”
  • Western Kanjobal: “having a straight soul” (source for this and two above: Nida 1952, p. 145)
  • Central Mazahua: “no longer carrying sin in God’s estimation.”
  • Rincón Zapotec: “come out good before God”
  • Guhu-Samane: “God called one right” (source for this and two above: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.)
  • Mairasi: “already straight: completely clean” (source: Enggavoter 2004)
  • Uma: “straight in God’s sight”
  • Yakan: “be reckoned straight/righteous by God”
  • Ekari: “maa nigajawii (“deem us right through favor”) (source: Marion Source in The Bible Translator 1963, p. 37f.)
  • Kwara’ae: “regard as righteous” (source: Norman Deck in The Bible Translator 1963, p. 34ff.)
  • Manikion: “heart sits next to Jesus” (source: Daud Soesilo)
  • Obolo: ben itip-oyerebet isan̄a: “take away condemnation” (source: Enene Enene)

entirely born in sins

The Greek that is translated as “you were entirely born in sins” or similar in English is translated as “you were born completely evil” in Ojitlán Chinantec, “not even being born yet you were a sinner” in Aguaruna, “you have done sin from the time you were born” in Xicotepec De Juárez Totonac, “you cursed one, you were born blind because of your evilness” in Yatzachi Zapotec, and “the way you were born shows that you are loaded with sin” in Rincón Zapotec.

(Source: M. Larson / B. Moore in Notes on Translation February 1970, p. 1-125.)