wisdom

The Greek that is translated as “wisdom” in English is rendered in Amganad Ifugao and Tabasco Chontal as “(big) mind,” in Bulu and Yamba as “heart thinking,” in Tae’ as “cleverness of heart” (source for this and all above: Reiling / Swellengrebel), in Palauan as “bright spirit (innermost)” (source: Bratcher / Hatton), in Ixcatlán Mazatec as “with your best/biggest thinking” (source: Robert Bascom), and in Dobel, it is translated with the idiom “their ear holes are long-lasting” (in Acts 6:3) (source: Jock Hughes).

See also wisdom (Proverbs).

afraid (terrified)

The Greek that is translated as “terrified” in English versions is idiomatically translated in Thai as “their souls flee and bile stirs up” or in Nyanja (Chichewa) as “their hearts came outside.”

See also afraid and also Seat of the Mind for traditional views of “ways of knowing, thinking, and feeling.”

cowardly

The Greek that is translated as “cowardly” in English versions is idiomatically translated in Thai as “white-eyed people.”

judge

The Greek that is translated as “judge” in English is rendered idiomatically in Yapese as “untie the words of” and in Nyanja (Chichewa) as “sing a (court) case against.”

rest

The Greek that is translated as “rest” in English is translated idiomatically in Nyanja (Chichewa) as “let the heart sit down.”