hovering over the face of the waters

The Hebrew that is translated into English as “moving (or: hovering) over the (sur)face of the waters” is translated into Ebira as “(the spirit of God) stayed above the water doing NANANA [ideophone].” (Source: Rob Koops)

In Bari it is translated with bibirto, “which is used of a bird hovering over its nest or fluttering round a bunch of ripe bananas.” (Source: Source: P. Guillebaud in The Bible Translator 1965, p. 189ff.)

In Kutu it is translated as “spreading over the water” and in Nyamwezi as ku’elela: “to circle around slowly over water, without touching it.” In Kwere it is translated with katanda, which carries the meaning of being ‘spread out’ over the water as one would spread a blanket out over a bed. (Source: Pioneer Bible Translators, project-specific translation notes in Paratext)

cubit

The Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek that is translated as “cubit” or into a metric or imperial measurement in English is translated in Kutu, Kwere, and Nyamwezi as makono or “armlength.” Since a cubit is the measurement from the elbow to the tip of the middle finger, one armlength (measured from the center of the chest to the fingertips) equals two cubits or roughly 1 meter. (Source: Pioneer Bible Translators, project-specific translation notes in Paratext)

In Klao it is converted into “hand spans” (app. 6 inches or 12 cm) and “finger spans” (app. 1 inch or 2 cm) (Source: Don Slager)

zealous / jealous (God)

The Hebrew that is translated in English as “zealous” or “jealous” referring to God as the one who has the emotion has to be translated in Kwere with a different term, a Swahili loan word, (wivu) than the one that is used for human jealousy or zeal (migongo). (Source: Pioneer Bible Translators, project-specific translation notes in Paratext)

midwife

The Hebrew that is translated as “midwife” in English is translated in Kwere as “old woman.” (Pioneer Bible Translators, project-specific translation notes in Paratext)

In the Thai Common Language version it is “a woman who helps the womb.” (See Translation commentary on Exod 1:15.)

bow to the ground

The Hebrew that is translated as “bow to the ground” or similar in English is translated in Kwere as “bowing knees and face touching the ground.” (Pioneer Bible Translators, project-specific translation notes in Paratext)

sinew

The Hebrew that is translated as “sinew” or similar in English is translated in Kwere as umuge, a word used for both softer muscle and tougher tendons, since there is no generic term for “tendon” or “sinew” in Kwere. (Pioneer Bible Translators, project-specific translation notes in Paratext)

feeble (sheep)

The Hebrew that is translated as “feeble” or similar in English is translated in Kwere as “thin, skinny.” (Pioneer Bible Translators, project-specific translation notes in Paratext)

hair (body hair)

The Hebrew that is translated as “hair” in English (relating to body hair is translated in Kwere as upipi — a word indicating small hairs. (Pioneer Bible Translators, project-specific translation notes in Paratext)

See also (human) head hair and hairy (like Esau).