faith comes from what is heard and what is heard comes through the word of Christ

The Greek that is translated in English as “faith comes from what is heard, and what is heard comes through the word of Christ” or similar is translated in Muyuw as “they will preach the talk about Christ, then some will listen and believe” since Muyuw does not allow for verbal nominalization (where a term like “faith” can become a noun from a verb).

untie sandals

The Greek that is translated as “(not worthy to) untie sandals” or similar in English is translated in Awa as “because he is an important one, when he speaks I will be silent” since “the Jewish idea of not being worthy of even removing the sandals of an important person is foreign to Papua New Guinea.”

Other languages express it this way: “I am not worthy to be his servant” (Yatzachi Zapotec), “if unworthy I should even carry his burden, it would not be right” (Alekano), or “I don’t compare with him” (Tenango Otomi). (Source: M. Larson / B. Moore in Notes on Translation February 1970, p. 1-125.)

grace and truth

The Greek that is translated as “grace and truth” in English is translated in Fasu as “He gave free big help and true talk.” Like many languages, Fasu does not allow for verbal nominalization where a verb can be turned into a noun.

Shipibo-Conibo translates it as “only having good thought, only having true words.” (Source: M. Larson / B. Moore in Notes on Translation February 1970, p. 1-125.)

See also grace.

Twin

When in the Greek text Thomas is also referred to with a term that is translated in English as “Twin,” it was dropped for the Siane translation because it was found that the word had a bad connotation for the Siane and it was not im­portant for the understanding of the story.

for the grace of God has appeared bringing salvation to all

The Greek that is translated as “for the grace of God has appeared, bringing salvation to all” or similar in English is translated in Wahgi as “God saying like this, ‘I desire to save without reward all people,’ sent Christ.” Like many languages, Wahgi not allow for verbal nominalization where a verb can be turned into a noun.

See also grace.

grace be with you

The Greek that is translated into English as “grace be with you” or similar is translated into Iatmul as “I want God to help all of you freely.” Like many languages, Iatmul does not allow for verbal nominalization where a verb can be turned into a noun.

See also grace.

complete verse (Acts 10:48)

In many languages, “events which are implied in a chrono­logical sequence need to be inserted in the translation. Acts 10:48 states, ‘he commanded them to be baptized . . . then they asked him to remain for some days;’ in Wahgi the additional actions ‘so they baptized them’ and ‘so Peter stayed with them’ had to be added so the readers would know both actions actually occurred.”

complete verse (Acts 1:4)

In many languages, “events which are implied in a chrono­logical sequence need to be inserted in the translation (…) In Acts 1:4 Jesus says, ‘Do not leave Jerusalem , but wait . . . ‘; in Gadsup the words ‘and then go’ were added at the end, otherwise the readers will think the injunction was never to leave.”