at that time, in those days

The Greek that is typically translated in English as “in those days” or “at that time” is translated by the Italian La Sua Parola è Vita translation as Qualche tempo dopo la nascita di Giovanni or “Some time after the birth of John.” Cotrozzi (2019) explains: “After a short summary of John’s youth (1:80) the story goes back in time. The shift, however, is not marked clearly in the original, and formal translations suggest that the events introduced in 2:1 followed those narrated in 1:80. The Greek phrase ἐν ταῖς ἡμέραις ἐκείναις (2:1) is best understood as referring back to the time of Herod the Great and more specifically the time after the birth of John the Baptist.”

in the fifteenth year of the reign of Emperor Tiberius

The Greek that is typically translated in English as “in the fifteenth year of the reign of Emperor Tiberius” is translated by the Italian La Sua Parola è Vita translation as Passarono circa due decenni. Era adesso il quindicesimo anno del regno dell’imperatore Tiberio Cesare or “About two decades passed. It was now the fifteenth year of the reign of Emperor Tiberius Caesar.” Cotrozzi (2019) explains: “There is a time gap between the last events recounted in 2:52 and those in 3:1. Jesus was 12 at the end of chapter 2 but about 30 years old when he began his work (3:23). As a result, some 18 years must have elapsed since 2:51-52. However, this is not readily apparent to most modern readers. All the more so since the gap coincides with a break at chapter level and is followed by the same name (Herod) as in 1:5 which seems to indicate continuity. What most readers are not aware of is that the same name refers in Luke to two different historical figures, Herod the Great (1:5) and his son Herod Antipas (3:1). Only a few Bibles — Danish Bibelen på Hverdagsdansk and Den Nye Aftale, English New Living Translation, French La Parole de Vie, German Die Gute Nachricht and Neues Leben Übersetzung, and Spanish Traducción en lenguaje actual — make this clear in the text.”

timing of Jesus's temptation

The Greek that is typically translated in English as “Jesus, filled with the Holy Spirit, went away (or: returned)” is translated by the Italian La Sua Parola è Vita translation as Dopo essere stato battezzato, Gesù, pieno di Spirito Santo, si allontanò or “After being baptized, Jesus, filled with the Holy Spirit, went away.” Cotrozzi (2019) explains: “After the interposition of the long genealogy between the baptism of Jesus (3:21-22) and the temptations in the desert (4:1-13) there is need for a clear connection between these two events, all the more so because the episode about the temptations is placed at the beginning of a new chapter. When tempted by the devil, Jesus is full of the Holy Spirit because the latter descended upon him at baptism. Without a clear reference to the verses of the previous chapter, the reader can easily miss this important connection in 4:1.”

You brood of vipers!

The Greek that is typically translated in English as “You brood of vipers! ” is translated by the Italian La Sua Parola è Vita translation as Razza di vipere! Venite a farvi battezzare, ma non siete disposti a cambiar vita! Chi vi ha fatto credere di poter sfuggire così all’imminente castigod di Dio? or “You brood of vipers! You come to be baptized but are not willing to change your life! Who made you believe you could escape God’s impending punishment in this way?” Cotrozzi (2019) explains: “There is a gap in the logic of the argument that is filled only in v. 8, but even so it is not readily apparent to many readers why John reacts in this way. John criticized the superficial attitude of the people who were content with outward baptism but would not change their lifestyle, thinking that this would be enough to secure them salvation. (…) The words that are added to the text are marked as an explanatory addition.”

as the sun was setting

The Greek that is typically translated in English as “as the sun was setting” is translated by the Italian La Sua Parola è Vita translation as Più tardi, quando con il calar del sole il giorno del riposo era giunto al termine or “Later, when with the setting of the sun, the day of rest had come to an end.” Cotrozzi (2019) explains: “The explanatory addition provides the key to understanding the text correctly. Without the explicit hint at the day of rest the verse remains somewhat puzzling and evokes an eerie feeling in the reader due to the gloomy context that speaks of diseases, darkness and demons.”

shake the dust off your feet

The Greek that is typically translated in English as “shake the dust off your feet as a testimony against them” (Luke 9:5) is translated by the Italian La Sua Parola è Vita translation more explicitly as lasciandola scuotete la polvere dai vostri piedi per mostrare che non avete più niente a che fare con loro e li lasciate al loro destino or “shake the dust off your feet to show that you do not have anything more to do with them and that you leave them to their fate.”

Luke 10:11, translated in English as “Even the dust of your town that clings to our feet, we wipe off in protest against you” or similar is strangulated as Non abbiamo più niente a che fare con voi e vi lasciamo al vostro destino. Ecco, riprendetevi anche la polvere della vostra città or “We do not have anything more to do with you and leave you to your fate. Here, take back also the dust of your city.”

Source: Cotrozzi 2019

See also shake off the dust from your feet.

angel of the Lord

The Greek that is typically translated in English as “angel of the Lord” is translated by the Italian La Sua Parola è Vita translation as angelo or “angel.” Cotrozzi (2019) explains: “Apart from a handful of verses where the context makes clear that fallen angels are in view (e. g. Matt 25:41; 2 Cor 12:17; Rev 9:11) the term ‘angel’ refers to a supernatural, spiritual being sent by God. This is the default sense that this term has in Italian, the meaning people think of when they hear this word in isolation. Since the occurrence in Luke 1:11 corresponds to the default case, there is no reason to state explicitly that the angel in question belongs to the Lord. On the contrary, the phrase ‘angel of the Lord’ may be confusing to readers not accustomed to church jargon.”

complete verse (Luke 18:17)

Following are a number of back-translations of Luke 18:17:

  • Uma: “Truly I say to you: If you do not submit to God like children, you will not become his people in his Kingdom.'” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “Truly I tell you,’ said Isa, ‘if the trusting of a person in God is not like the trusting of children, that person will really not be included in God’s ruling.'” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “It’s true what I say to you, that if there is a person and his trust in God is not like the trust of little children, then he cannot be ruled over by God.'” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “This that I tell you is true that if you don’t receive God’s ruling you like the way children receive, you will absolutely not be included there.'” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “This which I will say to you is true, that whoever won’t make himself like a little child in his submitting to the rule of God, he won’t be able to enter that kingdom of his.'” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)
  • Italian (La Sua Parola è Vita): “Indeed, I tell you that those who do not accept the Kingdom of God as a present with the same humility of a child will never be able to enter it!” (Cotrozzi 2019 explains: “Although some thought of childlike trustfulness may be present, the focus more probably lies on humility as shown by the context with its rebuke of proud Pharisees in 18:9-14.”)

complete verse (Luke 22:44)

Following are a number of back-translations of Luke 22:44:

  • Uma: “He exerted-great-effort praying, because he felt great suffering/sorrow. His sweat dripped to the ground like blood.]]” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “Because his liver was very grieved, he prayed very hard, therefore his sweat was like blood dripping on the ground.” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “And at that time Jesus became very sorrowful and he prayed all the harder to God, and his sweat dropped out just like blood.” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “And in this exceeding hardship of his, he persevered still-more to pray, and his sweat, it was like blood dripping to the soil.” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “His inside was churning terribly. Therefore he prayed with great intensity (lit. using up all that was in his mind/inner-being). Pitter-pattering on the ground was his sweat which was dripping which had blood in with it now.” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)
  • Italian (La Sua Parola è Vita): “In anguish he prayed even more intensely, sweat dripped copiously, as if it were blood from a wound.” (Cotrozzi 2019 explains: “Luke merely wants to highlight Jesus’ emotional strain ‘as so intense that he perspired profusely as a result. The sweat beads multiplied on his body like flowing clumps of blood and dropped to the earth.’”)

complete verse (Luke 7:8)

Following are a number of back-translations of Luke 7:8:

  • Uma: “Because me, I am also just a commanded-one, and there are also those whom I command. If for example there is my command to a soldier saying to him: ‘Go!,’ he definitely goes. If I call another soldier, ‘Come here!’ he definitely comes. If I say to my slaves, ‘Do that!’ they definitely do it. So also You(s) Father, what you(s) say there [where the listener is, but not the speaker], will definitely happen here.'” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “I know for even I am ruled over by the great ones/the ones higher up and I rule over the soldiers. If I say to one, ‘Go,’ he goes. If I say to another one, ‘Come here,’ he comes. And if I say to my servant, ‘Do this,’ he does it.'” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “I know, because it’s just like there’s someone who is in charge of me, and there are also soldiers that I’m in charge of and I command the one that he should come to me and he comes. I also send my servant, if I have anything for him to do, and he does it. It’s just the same with you, because what you say will come to pass.'” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “Because it’s reportedly the same with him that there are higher-ups who give-orders to him and there are also his soldiers to whom he gives-orders. If he tells one, ‘Go,’ he goes, and if he also says to one, ‘Come,’ he comes, and if he also tells his slave, ‘Do this,’ he does it.'” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “For I am used to verbal orders, because I also have a boss/leader who gives me orders, and there are soldiers to whom I give orders. If I say to one person, ‘Go,’ he really will go. Well if I say to the next, ‘Come here,’ he truly comes to me. It’s like that too with my servant, if I order him, ‘Do this,’ he truly will do it.'” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)
  • Italian (La Sua Parola è Vita): “I too am subject to the authority of my superiors and I myself have authority over my men; I know that if I give an order to any of them or to my servant, they obey me.” (Cotrozzi 2019 explains: “La Sua Parola è Vita quite boldly recasts the verse as indirect speech and generalizes its content to adapt it to Italian ears.”)

complete verse (Luke 7:20)

Following are a number of back-translations of Luke 7:20:

  • Uma: “Those two messengers really went, and they said to Yesus: ‘The reason we have come, Teacher, Yohanes ordered us (excl.) to ask you [lit, us (incl.), which is often used for second person honorific], whether you [lit, we (incl.)] are the Redeemer King that God promised, or whether there is still another that we (excl.) wait for.'” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “When the two came to Isa, they said, ‘Yahiya who bathes the people sends us here because he would like to know if you are the one foretold to come to the world or if there is still someone different that we (excl.) should expect to come.'” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “And when they arrived there to Jesus, they said, ‘The reason we have come here to you is because John, the Baptizer, sent us because he wants us to ask if you are the one he has been preaching that is to be sent by God, or is there someone else besides you, to be expected?'” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “When they arrived where Jesus was, they said, ‘Juan the Baptizer sent us (excl.) to inquire if you (singular) are the one God promised would come or if there is another to be waited for.'” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “When those who had been sent reached Jesus, they related it to him, saying, ‘We have been sent here by Juan who was baptizing, to ask you whether you are that one who was promised to come here or are we to wait for someone else?'” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)
  • Italian (La Sua Parola è Vita): “When they came to Jesus, the two repeated John’s words.” (Cotrozzi 2019 explains: “Hebrew is notorious for its habit of repeating phrases and clauses to highlight chunks of discourse. This occasionally applies to the Greek of the New Testament, reflecting the Semitic background of its authors or their sources. Luke emphasizes the question put to Jesus by repeating it a second time verbatim in 7:20 [cf. 7:19]. The problem is that a literal rendering at this point is rather annoying.”)