What then are we to say

In Kadiwéu, it is not possible to use a rhetorical question for the purpose of linking subjects as is done in this case in the Greek (and English) text. Instead, the translators translated the whole verse as “Our forefather Abraham, how did he become just (righteous) before God?” (Source: Glyn Griffiths in Notes on Translation June 1986, p. 25ff.)

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What then are we to say

In Kadiwéu, it is not possible to use a rhetorical question for the purpose of linking subjects as is done in this case in the Greek (and English) text. Instead, the translators translated this by altering the question to “What shall we do?” and retaining the following question. (Source: Glyn Griffiths in Notes on Translation June 1986, p. 25ff.)

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What then

In Kadiwéu, it is not possible to use a rhetorical question for the purpose of linking subjects as is done in this case in the Greek (and English) text. In this case, the link was maintained by omitting the question, making a statement concerning the basis upon which God accepts us, and then raising the potential objection. The verse then became “God accepts us because He is very good to us (grace), He does not accept us because (for reason that) we obey the Law that Moses brought. Does it matter, then, if we do what is bad?” (Source: Glyn Griffiths in Notes on Translation June 1986, p. 25ff.)

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What shall we say then

In Kadiwéu, it is not possible to use a rhetorical question for the purpose of linking subjects as is done in this case in the Greek (and English) text. Instead, the translators combined the two opening questions (“What then should we say? That the law is sin?” in English) in the translation to read “Is it possible for us to say (then) that the Law is evil?” (Source: Glyn Griffiths in Notes on Translation June 1986, p. 25ff.)

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What then are we to say about these things

In Kadiwéu, it is not possible to use a rhetorical question for the purpose of linking subjects as is done in this case in the Greek (and English) text. Here, the link question was treated by making explicit what are “these things.” The verse then started with a statement, followed by a question, “We see that God has made us His children, and that He helps us. Who is there that can overcome us?” (Source: Glyn Griffiths in Notes on Translation June 1986, p. 25ff.)

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What then are we to say

In Kadiwéu, it is not possible to use a rhetorical question for the purpose of linking subjects as is done in this case in the Greek (and English) text. Here, the link was maintained by omitting this first question, and then expanding the second question (“Is there injustice on God’s part?” in English) to now say, “Is God unjust when He chooses just those people He wants to choose?” (Source: Glyn Griffiths in Notes on Translation June 1986, p. 25ff.)

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What then are we to say

In Kadiwéu, it is not possible to use a rhetorical question for the purpose of linking subjects as is done in this case in the Greek (and English) text. Here, It was treated by dropping the question form and making a statement as follows: “We can see (then) that the non-Jews who did not seek to be accepted by God were accepted by Him because they trusted in Him.” (Source: Glyn Griffiths in Notes on Translation June 1986, p. 25ff.)

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What then

In Kadiwéu, it is not possible to use a rhetorical question for the purpose of linking subjects as is done in this case in the Greek (and English) text. Here, it was treated by including the introductory phrase “We can say then that…” at the beginning of the next statement and by omitting the rhetorical question. The verse, therefore, begins “We can say then that the people of Israel did not find what they were looking for.” (Source: Glyn Griffiths in Notes on Translation June 1986, p. 25ff.)

See also here.