Jesus heals a boy

Image taken from the Wiedmann Bible. For more information about the images and ways to adopt them, see here .

For other images of Willy Wiedmann paintings in TIPs, see here.

teacher

The Greek that is translated as “teacher” (also: “master”) in English is translated in the 1941 Yiddish by Einspruch as rebe (רֶבּי) or “Rabbi” in an effort to identify Jesus as a teacher of the Jews. (Source: Naomi Seidmann in Elliott / Boer 2012, p. 151ff.)

Likewise, a number of Hebrew translations, including the 2018 and 2020 editions by the The Bible Society in Israel also use “Rabbi” (רַבִּי).

See also rabbi.

complete verse (Luke 9:38)

Following are a number of back-translations of Luke 9:38:

  • Noongar: “Among the crowd, one man shouted, ‘Lord! I beg you, look at this my son, my only son!” (Source: Warda-Kwabba Luke-Ang)
  • Uma: “There was a man in the midst of the many people who called, he said: ‘Teacher! Help me! Look at my child for me. He is my only child.” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “There was a man from the crowd calling, he said, ‘O Sir, I beg you have pity on my child, this is my only child.” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “There was a man there who called to Jesus, he said, ‘Oh Chief, come and look here at my male child, my son. He is my only child.” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “Then one of them shouted-right-out, ‘Lord! Please kindly (strong request particle) look, because this is my only child!” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “There was a man there in that mass who was calling out, saying, ‘Teacher, please do pity my child who is a young-boy. He’s my only child.” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)

request / beg (Japanese honorifics)

Like a number of other East Asian languages, Japanese uses a complex system of honorifics, i.e. a system where a number of different levels of politeness are expressed in language via words, word forms or grammatical constructs. These can range from addressing someone or referring to someone with contempt (very informal) to expressing the highest level of reference (as used in addressing or referring to God) or any number of levels in-between.

One way to do this is through the usage (or a lack) of an honorific prefix as shown here in the widely-used Japanese Shinkaiyaku (新改訳) Bible of 2017.

The concept of “requesting” is translated in the Shinkaiyaku Bible as o-negai (お願い), combining “request” (negai) with the respectful prefix o-.

(Source: S. E. Doi, see also S. E. Doi in Journal of Translation, 18/2022, p. 37ff. )

Japanese benefactives (yatte)

Like a number of other East Asian languages, Japanese uses a complex system of honorifics, i.e. a system where a number of different levels of politeness are expressed in language via words, word forms or grammatical constructs. These can range from addressing someone or referring to someone with contempt (very informal) to expressing the highest level of reference (as used in addressing or referring to God) or any number of levels in-between.

One way Japanese show different degree of politeness is through the choice of a benefactive construction as shown here in the widely-used Japanese Shinkaiyaku (新改訳) Bible of 2017.

Here, yatte (やって) or “do for their sake” is used in combination with kudasaru (くださる), a respectful form of the benefactive kureru (くれる). A benefactive reflects the good will of the giver or the gratitude of a recipient of the favor. To convey this connotation, English translation needs to employ a phrase such as “for me (my sake)” or “for you (your sake).”

(Source: S. E. Doi, see also S. E. Doi in Journal of Translation, 18/2022, p. 37ff. )

imperatives (kudasai / Japanese honorifics)

Like a number of other East Asian languages, Japanese uses a complex system of honorifics, i.e. a system where a number of different levels of politeness are expressed in language via words, word forms or grammatical constructs. These can range from addressing someone or referring to someone with contempt (very informal) to expressing the highest level of reference (as used in addressing or referring to God) or any number of levels in-between.

One way Japanese show different degree of politeness is through the choice of an imperative construction as shown here in the widely-used Japanese Shinkaiyaku (新改訳) Bible of 2017.

In these verses, the honorific form kudasai (ください) reflects that the action is called for as a favor for the sake of the beneficiary. This polite kudasai imperative form is often translated as “please” in English. While English employs pure imperatives in most imperative constructions (“Do this!”), Japanese chooses the polite kudasai (“Do this, please.”).

(Source: S. E. Doi, see also S. E. Doi in Journal of Translation, 18/2022, p. 37ff. )

Translation commentary on Luke 9:38

Exegesis:

kai idou lit. ‘and behold,’ cf. on 1.20.

anēr apo tou ochlou eboēsen ‘a man from the crowd shouted.’ apo tou ochlou goes with anēr and has the function of a partitive genitive, cf. “a man in the crowd” (New English Bible). For a different interpretation cf. The Four Gospels – a New Translation. For boaō cf. on 3.4.

didaskale ‘teacher,’ cf. on 3.12.

deomai sou epiblepsai epi ton huion mou ‘I beseech you to look at my son.’ For epiblepō cf. on 1.48.

hoti monogenēs moi estin ‘for he is my only child,’ cf. on 7.12.

Translation:

A man from the crowd, i.e. from amongst the many people mentioned in v. 37.

Cried, or, ‘shouted,’ ‘spoke loudly.’

For to look upon see on “to regard” in 1.48 and the closely synonymous “to look on” in 1.25; for he is my only child see on “child” in 1.7 and “only son” in 7.12.

Quoted with permission from Reiling, J. and Swellengrebel, J.L. A Handbook on the Gospel of Luke. (UBS Handbook Series). New York: UBS, 1971. For this and other handbooks for translators see here . Make sure to also consult the Handbook on the Gospel of Mark for parallel or similar verses.