John the Evangelist (icon)

Following is a Bulgarian Orthodox icon of John the Evangelist from the 14th century (found in Rila Monastery, Bulgaria).

Orthodox Icons are not drawings or creations of imagination. They are in fact writings of things not of this world. Icons can represent our Lord Jesus Christ, the Virgin Mary, and the Saints. They can also represent the Holy Trinity, Angels, the Heavenly hosts, and even events. Orthodox icons, unlike Western pictures, change the perspective and form of the image so that it is not naturalistic. This is done so that we can look beyond appearances of the world, and instead look to the spiritual truth of the holy person or event. (Source )

Peter (icon)

Following is a Armenian Orthodox icon of Peter (found in the Ghazanchetsots Cathedral in Shusha, Azerbaijan).

Orthodox Icons are not drawings or creations of imagination. They are in fact writings of things not of this world. Icons can represent our Lord Jesus Christ, the Virgin Mary, and the Saints. They can also represent the Holy Trinity, Angels, the Heavenly hosts, and even events. Orthodox icons, unlike Western pictures, change the perspective and form of the image so that it is not naturalistic. This is done so that we can look beyond appearances of the world, and instead look to the spiritual truth of the holy person or event. (Source )

inclusive vs. exclusive pronoun (Acts 3:4)

Many languages distinguish between inclusive and exclusive first-person plural pronouns (“we”). (Click or tap here to see more details)

The inclusive “we” specifically includes the addressee (“you and I and possibly others”), while the exclusive “we” specifically excludes the addressee (“he/she/they and I, but not you”). This grammatical distinction is called “clusivity.” While Semitic languages such as Hebrew or most Indo-European languages such as Greek or English do not make that distinction, translators of languages with that distinction have to make a choice every time they encounter “we” or a form thereof (in English: “we,” “our,” or “us”).

For this verse, translators typically select the exclusive form (excluding the man who was lame) or the dual (Peter and John).

Source: Velma Pickett and Florence Cowan in Notes on Translation January 1962, p. 1ff.

complete verse (Acts 3:4)

Following are a number of back-translations of Acts 3:4:

  • Uma: “Petrus and Yohanes stared at that lame person. Petrus said to him: ‘Look at us (excl.)!'” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “Petros and Yahiya looked at him intently. Then Petros said, ‘Look at us (excl.).'” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “And Peter and John looked at him and Peter said, ‘Friend, look at us.'” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “Whereupon they looked-straight-at him and Pedro said, ‘Please look at us (excl.).'” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “They two looked straight at that person and then Pedro spoke. He said, ‘Look at us (excl.).'” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)