What then

In Kadiwéu, it is not possible to use a rhetorical question for the purpose of linking subjects as is done in this case in the Greek (and English) text. Here, it was treated by including the introductory phrase “We can say then that…” at the beginning of the next statement and by omitting the rhetorical question. The verse, therefore, begins “We can say then that the people of Israel did not find what they were looking for.” (Source: Glyn Griffiths in Notes on Translation June 1986, p. 25ff.)

See also here.

What then

In Kadiwéu, it is not possible to use a rhetorical question for the purpose of linking subjects as is done in this case in the Greek (and English) text. In this case, the link was maintained by omitting the question, making a statement concerning the basis upon which God accepts us, and then raising the potential objection. The verse then became “God accepts us because He is very good to us (grace), He does not accept us because (for reason that) we obey the Law that Moses brought. Does it matter, then, if we do what is bad?” (Source: Glyn Griffiths in Notes on Translation June 1986, p. 25ff.)

See also here.