What then are we to say

In Kadiwéu, it is not possible to use a rhetorical question for the purpose of linking subjects as is done in this case in the Greek (and English) text. Here, It was treated by dropping the question form and making a statement as follows: “We can see (then) that the non-Jews who did not seek to be accepted by God were accepted by Him because they trusted in Him.” (Source: Glyn Griffiths in Notes on Translation June 1986, p. 25ff.)

See also here.

What then are we to say

In Kadiwéu, it is not possible to use a rhetorical question for the purpose of linking subjects as is done in this case in the Greek (and English) text. Here, the link was maintained by omitting this first question, and then expanding the second question (“Is there injustice on God’s part?” in English) to now say, “Is God unjust when He chooses just those people He wants to choose?” (Source: Glyn Griffiths in Notes on Translation June 1986, p. 25ff.)

See also here.

What then are we to say

In Kadiwéu, it is not possible to use a rhetorical question for the purpose of linking subjects as is done in this case in the Greek (and English) text. Instead, the translators translated this by altering the question to “What shall we do?” and retaining the following question. (Source: Glyn Griffiths in Notes on Translation June 1986, p. 25ff.)

See also here.

What then are we to say

In Kadiwéu, it is not possible to use a rhetorical question for the purpose of linking subjects as is done in this case in the Greek (and English) text. Instead, the translators translated the whole verse as “Our forefather Abraham, how did he become just (righteous) before God?” (Source: Glyn Griffiths in Notes on Translation June 1986, p. 25ff.)

See also here.