justice

The Greek, Hebrew, Aramaic and Latin that is translated as “justice” in English is translated in American Sign Language with a sign that describes the quality or principle of fairness, righteousness, and impartiality in treating other people. A literal back-translation of the signs are “FOLLOW(God is implied) ACTIONS, DECISIONS JUST-RIGHT”. A more idiomatic back-translation would be: “actions and decisions are right/fitting/just in accordance to God’s will.” The movement in the signs itself helps to indicate that this is a noun, not a verb. (Source: RuthAnna Spooner, Ron Lawer)


“Justice” in American Sign Language, source: Deaf Harbor

Abram

The term that is transliterated as “Abram” in English is translated in American Sign Language with the sign signifying sojourning with a staff, clearly differentiating it from Abraham. (Source: RuthAnna Spooner, Ron Lawer)


“Abram” in American Sign Language, source: Deaf Harbor

Mary Magdalene

The term that is transliterated as “Mary Magdalene” in English is translated in American Sign Language with a sign signifying 7 demons having gone out, referring to Luke 8:2. (Source: RuthAnna Spooner, Ron Lawer)


“Mary Magdalene” in American Sign Language, source: Deaf Harbor

Barnabas

The term that is transliterated as “Barnabas” in English is translated in American Sign Language with a combination of the signs for the letter B and “encourage” (referring to Acts 11:23). (Source: RuthAnna Spooner, Ron Lawer)


“Barnabas” in American Sign Language, source: Deaf Harbor

Click or tap here to see a short video clip about Barnabas (source: Bible Lands 2012)

Caleb

The term that is transliterated as “Caleb” in English is translated in American Sign Language with one variation of the sign for “watch,” a reference to the fact that Caleb was one of the twelve who surveyed the Promised Land. The sign also alludes to watch dogs, a reference to Caleb’s enduring loyalty to God. (Source: RuthAnna Spooner, Ron Lawer)


“Caleb” in American Sign Language, source: Deaf Harbor

In Spanish Sign Language it is translated with the sign for “spy.” (Source: Steve Parkhurst)


“Caleb” in Spanish Sign Language, source: Sociedad Bíblica de España

Nebuchadnezzar

The term that is transliterated as “Nebuchadnezzar” in English is translated in American Sign Language with the signs for “king” and one signifying a wavy beard, referring to the common way of wearing a beard in Mesopotamia (see here ). (Source: RuthAnna Spooner, Ron Lawer)


“Nebuchadnezzar” in American Sign Language, source: Deaf Harbor

In Spanish Sign Language it is translated with a sign depicting “idol in my image,” referring to Daniel 3:1. (Source: Steve Parkhurst)


“Nebuchadnezzar” in Spanish Sign Language, source: Sociedad Bíblica de España

Levite

The Greek, Hebrew, Aramaic and Latin that is transliterated “Levites” in English (only the Contemporary English Version translates it as “temple helpers”) is translated in Ojitlán Chinantec as “temple caretakers,” Yatzachi Zapotec as “people born in the family line of Levi, people whose responsibility it was to do the work in the important church of the Israelites,” in Alekano as “servants in the sacrifice house from Jerusalem place,” and in Tenango Otomi as “helpers of priests.” (Source: M. Larson / B. Moore in Notes on Translation February 1970, p. 1-125.)

In American Sign Language with a sign that combines “temple” + “servant.” (Source: RuthAnna Spooner, Ron Lawer)


“Levite” in American Sign Language, source: Deaf Harbor

For the sign in Spanish Sign Language, see Levi.