terrors have destroyed me

The Hebrew that is translated as “(your) terrors have destroyed me” or similar in English is translated in Sar as “The great fear you send in my belly is killing me mámák.” Mámák (or elsewhere mak) is an ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) that emphasizes the expression. It “means leaving nothing, without restriction, completely (positive or negative). Examples: a fire that is completely extinguished, a paralyzed arm/leg, having eaten without leaving anything, to be really dead. In the figurative sense: to die of fear, to believe with all one’s strength, to be really the child of a person.” (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.)

See also die and set their hope in God.

roar

The Hebrew that is translated as “roar” in English is reinforced in its sound in Sar with the ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) bu bu (“Let the sound of the great river with everything in it speak bu bu“). Bu bu otherwise is often used for thunder. (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.)

utterly spent and crushed

The Hebrew that is translated as “utterly spent and crushed” or similar in English is emphasized in Sar with the ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) yaw (“My body weakens yaw“). Yaw means “without resistance, without difficulty, easily. Examples: my arms are tired, he makes the rope slide without difficulty, the rope has slipped out of my hands, he goes to people’s houses without any trouble (when it is not suitable).” (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.).

die

The Hebrew that is translated as “they die” in English is emphasized in Sar with the ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) mak (or elsewhere mámák) (“they die mak“). Mak “means leaving nothing, without restriction, completely (positive or negative). Examples: a fire that is completely extinguished, a paralyzed arm/leg, having eaten without leaving anything, to be really dead. In the figurative sense: to die of fear, to believe with all one’s strength, to be really the child of a person.” (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.).

See also terrors have destroyed me and set their hope in God.

throb (heart)

The Hebrew that is translated as “(my heart) throbs” in English is reinforced in its sound in Sar with the ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) diw diw (“My heart throbs diw diw“). Diw diw “emphasizes the extreme weakness, the troubled spirit of the psalmist in the face of his triumphant friends.” (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.)

light up my darkness

The Hebrew that is translated as “lights up my darkness” or similar in English is emphasized in Sar with the ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) kow (“illuminates my darkness kow“). Kow “expresses what remains fixed and or open. Examples: a fish that keeps its mouth open, a door that has remained open, a light that does not move.” (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.).

gaunt

The Hebrew that is translated as “gaunt” in English is reinforced in Sar with the ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) kakəla (“And my body is exhausted with thinness kakəla“).Kakəla “envokes the idea of being unique or small. [Here] it reinforces the image of extreme thinning of the body.” (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.)

feed on it

The Hebrew that is translated as “feed on it” in English is emphasized in Sar with the ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) nánáḿ (“Animals eat its leaves nánáḿ“). Nánáḿ “means in totality, without exception or distinction, forming a whole. Examples: the wound is closed, they caught all the goats, he ate everything.” (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.).

moan

The Hebrew that is translated as “moan” in English is reinforced in Sar with the ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) rus rus (“I shout rus rus). Rus rus “evokes a moan or short breathing”. (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.)

without understanding

The Hebrew that is translated as “without understanding” or similar in English is reinforced in Sar with the ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) páráńg á (“Do not imitate the horse or donkey which are beasts páráńg á). Páráńg á stands for “‘a lot.’ Examples: a person who smells strongly of beer, being terribly thirsty, words that exasperated a person.” (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.)

deep darkness

The Hebrew that is translated as “deep darkness” in English is emphasized in Sar with the ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) nding (“You threw us out to bring us down into nding darkness”), Nding “means dense, thick, insensitive, immobile, impenetrable. Examples: very thick porridge, a place plunged into deep darkness, thick clouds, stagnant water, dense dust, standing still without speaking, having heavy eyes, feeling heavy, having a heavy head, a place that’s crowded with people, a door tightly closed.” (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.).