darkened (eyes)

The Hebrew that is translated as “darkened” in English is emphasized in Sar with the ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) nding which “means dense, thick, insensitive, immobile, impenetrable. Examples: very thick porridge, a place plunged into deep darkness, thick clouds, stagnant water, dense dust, standing still without speaking, having heavy eyes, feeling heavy, having a heavy head, a place that’s crowded with people, a door tightly closed.” (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.).

silence

The Hebrew that is translated as “silence” in English is reinforced in Sar with the ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) kúkúkú (“a place which is silent kúkúkú“). Kúkúkú expresses “calm (lack of noise), slow movement, or something fixed. Examples: the sky which is covered with big clouds, the great calm which reigns in the middle of the night, the clouds which move, very slowly, without wind, rain or noise.” (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.)

See also silent (to me) and silent.

overflow

The Hebrew that is translated as “overflow” or similar in English is translated in Sar with the ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) rerep which “means well adjusted, the right measure for objects that join. Examples: the pants are just right for her, he is sitting on her legs (folded up) properly, she has a falling garment that just touches the ground.” (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.)

See also cover (verb).

shut up his compassion

The Hebrew that is translated as “shut up his compassion” or similar in English is translated in Sar as “close his eye njárárá.” Njárárá is an ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) which “means firm (attitude), straightforward (direction). Examples: doesn’t respond at all, crosses water directly towards them.” (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.).

despoil

The Hebrew that is translated as “despoil” or “destroy” in English is reinforced in Sar with the ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) gúú (“the wicked who plundered me gúú“). Gúú expresses force and violence. (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.)

See also plunder.

root out

The Hebrew that is translated as “root out” in English is emphasized in Sar with the ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) sák sák (“(You) destroy (the village) sák sák“). Sák sák means “empty, without anything, exhausted, tired, damaged. destroyed, cleaned up, without intermediary. Examples: illness has exhausted him, the calabash has shattered into several pieces, the calabash is destroyed and irreparable.” (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.).

See also break down.

plunder

The Hebrew that is translated as “plunder” in English is reinforced in Sar with the ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) gúú (“strangers take his winnings gúú“). Gúú expresses force and violence. (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.)

See also despoil.

cover (verb)

The Hebrew that is translated as “cover” or similar in English is emphasized in Sar with the ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) rep (“as an oufit fits rep“). Rep “means well adjusted, the right measure for objects that join. Examples: the pants are just right for her, he is sitting on her legs (folded up) properly, she has a falling garment that just touches the ground.” (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.)

See also overflow.

break down

The Hebrew that is translated as “break down” in English is emphasized in Sar with the ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) sák sák (“(The Lord will) destroy them sák sák“). Sák sákmeans “empty, without anything, exhausted, tired, damaged. destroyed, cleaned up, without intermediary. Examples: illness has exhausted him, the calabash has shattered into several pieces, the calabash is destroyed and irreparable.” (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.).

See also root out.

shudder (mountains)

The Hebrew that is translated as “shudder” in English is reinforced in Sar with the ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) ngin ngin (“The roots of the mountain dance / move ngin ngin“). Ngin ngin “evokes bulky, imposing, strong things (noise, shaking). Examples: the cold makes you tremble hard, the big drum makes a loud rolling noise, the thunder rolls, distant noise, depositing large droppings somewhere.” (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.)

See also shake.

your hand was heavy upon me

The Hebrew that is translated as “your hand was heavy upon me” or similar in English is translated in Sar as “Your hand hits my head rututu.” Rututu) is an ideophone (a word that expresses what is perceived by the five senses) which “evokes a regular, equal or orderly arrangement of a set of small objects, a more or less equal distribution over time. Examples: the children (lined up or side by side) are the same size, I’m all sweaty, he has a rash of little pimples all over his body (…), he scolds us regularly.” (Source: Ngarbolnan Riminan in Le Sycomore 2000, p. 20ff.)