rhetorical questions (Matt 6:25)

During the translation of the New Testament into Huixtán Tzotzil, translation consultant Marion Cowan found that questions where the answer is obvious, affirmative rhetorical questions, as well questions raising objections tended to cause confusion among the readers. So these are rendered as simple or emphatic statements.

Accordingly, Matthew 6:25b reads “Your food is not important: your life is important. Your clothes are not important: your body is important.”

Source: Marion Cowan in The Bible Translator 1960, p. 123ff.

rhetorical questions (John 13:6)

During the translation of the New Testament into Huixtán Tzotzil, translation consultant Marion Cowan found that questions where the answer is obvious, affirmative rhetorical questions, as well questions raising objections tended to cause confusion among the readers. So these are rendered as simple or emphatic statements.

Accordingly, John 13:6 reads “Lord, I don’t want you to wash my feet.”

Source: Marion Cowan in The Bible Translator 1960, p. 123ff.

rhetorical questions (Matt 6:26)

During the translation of the New Testament into Huixtán Tzotzil, translation consultant Marion Cowan found that questions where the answer is obvious, affirmative rhetorical questions, as well questions raising objections tended to cause confusion among the readers. So these are rendered as simple or emphatic statements.

Accordingly, Matthew 6:26b reads “You are more taken into account than they (the birds).”

Source: Marion Cowan in The Bible Translator 1960, p. 123ff.

rhetorical questions (John 21:22)

During the translation of the New Testament into Huixtán Tzotzil, translation consultant Marion Cowan found that questions where the answer is obvious, affirmative rhetorical questions, as well questions raising objections tended to cause confusion among the readers. So these are rendered as simple or emphatic statements.

Accordingly, John 21:22a reads “If I want to arrive and find him living. that is not your responsibility (affair or business).”

Source: Marion Cowan in The Bible Translator 1960, p. 123ff.

rhetorical questions (Matt 6:27)

During the translation of the New Testament into Huixtán Tzotzil, translation consultant Marion Cowan found that questions where the answer is obvious, affirmative rhetorical questions, as well questions raising objections tended to cause confusion among the readers. So these are rendered as simple or emphatic statements.

Accordingly, Matthew 6:27a reads “Even if you worry a lot, you cannot make longer your time of living.”

Source: Marion Cowan in The Bible Translator 1960, p. 123ff.

rhetorical questions (John 4:35)

During the translation of the New Testament into Huixtán Tzotzil, translation consultant Marion Cowan found that questions where the answer is obvious, affirmative rhetorical questions, as well questions raising objections tended to cause confusion among the readers. So these are rendered as simple or emphatic statements.

Accordingly, John 4:35a reads “Thus you say: It still lacks four months to reach the time of harvest, you say.”

Source: Marion Cowan in The Bible Translator 1960, p. 123ff.

rhetorical questions (John 6:70)

During the translation of the New Testament into Huixtán Tzotzil, translation consultant Marion Cowan found that questions where the answer is obvious, affirmative rhetorical questions, as well questions raising objections tended to cause confusion among the readers. So these are rendered as simple or emphatic statements.

Accordingly, John 6:70 reads “You twelve were chosen by me. One a devil has entered his heart.”

Source: Marion Cowan in The Bible Translator 1960, p. 123ff.

rhetorical questions (John 7:51)

During the translation of the New Testament into Huixtán Tzotzil, translation consultant Marion Cowan found that questions where the answer is obvious, affirmative rhetorical questions, as well questions raising objections tended to cause confusion among the readers. So these are rendered as simple or emphatic statements.

Accordingly, John 7:51 reads “Thus says our law that first we ask the one who is to be judged, first we find out what sin he has committed.”

Source: Marion Cowan in The Bible Translator 1960, p. 123ff.

During the translation of the New Testament into Huixtán Tzotzil, translation consultant Marion Cowan found that questions where the answer is obvious, affirmative rhetorical questions, as well questions raising objections tended to cause confusion among the readers. So these are rendered as simple or emphatic statements.

Accordingly, Matthew 7:9-11 reads “If your son asks you for a tortilla to eat, not a stone you would give him. If he asks you for fish to eat, not a snake you would give him. You whose hearts are not good, know what good gifts you will give your children. Your father in heaven surpassingly knows what good gifts he will give to those who ask him.”

Source: Marion Cowan in The Bible Translator 1960, p. 123ff.

rhetorical questions (John 7:48)

During the translation of the New Testament into Huixtán Tzotzil, translation consultant Marion Cowan found that questions where the answer is obvious, affirmative rhetorical questions, as well questions raising objections tended to cause confusion among the readers. So these are rendered as simple or emphatic statements.

Accordingly, John 7:48 reads “Not one has believed of the authorities or of the Pharisees.”

Source: Marion Cowan in The Bible Translator 1960, p. 123ff.

rhetorical questions (John 18:35)

During the translation of the New Testament into Huixtán Tzotzil, translation consultant Marion Cowan found that questions where the answer is obvious, affirmative rhetorical questions, as well questions raising objections tended to cause confusion among the readers. So these are rendered as simple or emphatic statements.

Accordingly, John 18:35 reads “Pilate said to him, I am not a Jew.”

Source: Marion Cowan in The Bible Translator 1960, p. 123ff.

may be in you, might remain in you

The Greek that is translated in English as “(my joy) might remain in you” or “(my joy) may be in you” is translated in Tzotzil as “these things I have told you in order that your hearts may be happy-untroubled like my heart is happy-untroubled.”

“If Jesus’ words in John 15:11 were to be translated literally (…) it would infer that Jesus had given all His joy away and so not have any Himself.” (Source: Marion Cowan in The Bible Translator 1963, p. 90)

See also we might become the righteousness of God.