rhetorical questions (Matt 6:27)

During the translation of the New Testament into Huixtán Tzotzil, translation consultant Marion Cowan found that questions where the answer is obvious, affirmative rhetorical questions, as well questions raising objections tended to cause confusion among the readers. So these are rendered as simple or emphatic statements.

Accordingly, Matthew 6:27a reads “Even if you worry a lot, you cannot make longer your time of living.”

Source: Marion Cowan in The Bible Translator 1960, p. 123ff.

they are foolishness to them

The Greek that is translated as “they are foolishness to them” or similar in English is translated in Huixtán Tzotzil as “he mistakenly think they are empty words.” Huixtán Tzotzil frequently uses the verb -cuy to express “to mistakenly think something” from the point of view of the speaker. (Source: Marion M. Cowan in Notes on Translation 20/1966, pp. 6ff.)

you have hidden these things from the wise

The Greek that is translated as “you have hidden these things from the wise” or similar in English is translated in Huixtán Tzotzil as “you have hidden these things from those who mistakenly think they are wise.” Huixtán Tzotzil frequently uses the verb -cuy to express “to mistakenly think something” from the point of view of the speaker. (Source: Marion M. Cowan in Notes on Translation 20/1966, pp. 6ff.)

rhetorical questions (John 4:35)

During the translation of the New Testament into Huixtán Tzotzil, translation consultant Marion Cowan found that questions where the answer is obvious, affirmative rhetorical questions, as well questions raising objections tended to cause confusion among the readers. So these are rendered as simple or emphatic statements.

Accordingly, John 4:35a reads “Thus you say: It still lacks four months to reach the time of harvest, you say.”

Source: Marion Cowan in The Bible Translator 1960, p. 123ff.

Who warned you to flee from the wrath to come?

The Greek that is translated as “Who warned you to flee from the wrath to come?” or similar in English is translated in Huixtán Tzotzil as “You mistakenly think that if you receive baptism God will not punish you, you mistakenly think.” Huixtán Tzotzil frequently uses the verb -cuy to express “to mistakenly think something” from the point of view of the speaker. (Source: Marion M. Cowan in Notes on Translation 20/1966, pp. 6ff.)

I will destroy the wisdom of the wise

The Greek that is translated as “I will destroy the wisdom of the wise” or similar in English is translated in Huixtán Tzotzil as “I will destroy the wisdom of the hearts of those who mistakenly think they are wise.” Huixtán Tzotzil frequently uses the verb -cuy to express “to mistakenly think something” from the point of view of the speaker. (Source: Marion M. Cowan in Notes on Translation 20/1966, pp. 6ff.)

rhetorical questions (John 6:70)

During the translation of the New Testament into Huixtán Tzotzil, translation consultant Marion Cowan found that questions where the answer is obvious, affirmative rhetorical questions, as well questions raising objections tended to cause confusion among the readers. So these are rendered as simple or emphatic statements.

Accordingly, John 6:70 reads “You twelve were chosen by me. One a devil has entered his heart.”

Source: Marion Cowan in The Bible Translator 1960, p. 123ff.

You believe that God is one; you do well

The Greek that is translated as “You believe that God is one; you do well” or similar in English is translated in Huixtán Tzotzil as “I’ve believed that there is only one God, you say. You mistakenly think that is enough.” Huixtán Tzotzil frequently uses the verb -cuy to express “to mistakenly think something” from the point of view of the speaker. (Source: Marion M. Cowan in Notes on Translation 20/1966, pp. 6ff.)