receive, welcome

The Greek that is rendered in English as “welcomed” or “received” is translated into Aari as “taken hold of in love.”

a man against his father and a daughter against her mother

In Afar the Greek that is translated into English as “a man against his father, and a daughter against her mother” is translated as lab-baxa kay abbah fillat, say-baxa tet inah fillat . . . umaaneh tittin amot haa’gida: “that a male child place on his father’s neck, (and) a female child on her mother’s neck . . . together on their heads for evil.” (Accusation is placing evil on the neck or head of the person.)

trouble

The Hebrew that is translated as “troubled” in many English versions is translated into Anuak as “stirred the people’s head.”

person

The Hebrew that is rendered in English versions as “I’m not the kind of person that runs and hides” or “Should a man like me run away?” was translated into Afar as Kudaah ambooqorem, yi migaq hinna.: “My name is not fleeing and hiding.” (One’s character is one’s name in Afar idiom.)

hypocrite

(To view the different translations of this term in a simplified graphical form on a new page, click or tap here.)

The Greek and Hebrew terms that are translated as “hypocrite” in English typically have a counterpart in most languages. According to Bratcher / Nida (1961, p. 225), they can be categorized into the following categories:

  • those which employ some concept of “two” or “double”
  • those which make use of some expression of “mouth” or “speaking”
  • those which are based upon some special cultural feature
  • those which employ a non-metaphorical phrase

Following is a list of (back-) translations from some languages:

See also hypocrisy.

tingle

The phrase that is rendered in English versions as “the ears of everyone who hears of it (disaster) will tingle” is translated into Afar as “yaabbe marih xagarak xoq qiddahiyya”: “(disaster) that will make the bodies of the people who hear it perspire.” (A different bodily reaction associated with frightening news in Afar idiom.)

chariot

The Hebrew that is translated into English as “chariot” is translated into Anuak as “canoe pulled by horse.” “Canoe” is the general term for “vehicle.”

See also cart.

God's seed

In Aari the Greek that is typically translated into English as “(God’s) nature” or “(God’s) seed” is translated as “God’s thoughts.”

motion to

In Afar the term that is translated into English as “motion to” is translated as minin cassa heeh: “signal with eyebrow.”

See also motion (to speak).

beautiful eyes

The Hebrew that is translated as “beautiful eyes” in many English versions is translated into Anuak as “white eyes” (i.e. “big” eyes). Red eyes or small eyes are not considered to be attractive.

mourn

The Hebrew that is rendered in English translations as “Haman hurried to his house, mourning and with his head covered” was translated into Afar as Haaman wacarriyih namma gaba amol luk isi buxah arduk yuduure.: “Haman, having both hands on his head in shame, returned to his home running.” (Shame is shown by placing both hands on top of one’s head.)

See also shake the head.

compassion, moved with compassion

The Greek that is translated with “moved with compassion (or: pity)” in English is translated as “to see someone with sorrow” in Piro, “to suffer with someone” in Huastec, or “one’s mind to be as it were out of one” in Balinese (source: Bratcher / Nida).

The term “compassion” is translated as “cries in the soul” in Shilluk (source: Nida, 1952, p. 132), “has a good stomach” (=”sympathetic”) in Aari (source: Loren Bliese) or “has a big liver” in Una (source: Kroneman 2004, p. 471). In Mairasi it is translated with an emphasized term that is used for “love”: “desiring one’s face so much” (source: Enggavoter 2004).

See also Seat of the Mind for traditional views of “ways of knowing, thinking, and feeling.”