mourn

The Hebrew that is rendered in English translations as “Haman hurried to his house, mourning and with his head covered” was translated into Afar as Haaman wacarriyih namma gaba amol luk isi buxah arduk yuduure.: “Haman, having both hands on his head in shame, returned to his home running.” (Shame is shown by placing both hands on top of one’s head.)

See also shake the head.

compassion, moved with compassion

The Greek that is translated with “moved with compassion (or: pity)” in English is translated as “to see someone with sorrow” in Piro, “to suffer with someone” in Huastec, or “one’s mind to be as it were out of one” in Balinese (source: Bratcher / Nida).

The term “compassion” is translated as “cries in the soul” in Shilluk (source: Nida, 1952, p. 132), “has a good stomach” (=”sympathetic”) in Aari (source: Loren Bliese), “has a big liver” in Una (source: Kroneman 2004, p. 471), or “crying in one’s stomach” in Q’anjob’al (source: Newberry and Kittie Cox in The Bible Translator 1950, p. 91ff.). In Mairasi it is translated with an emphasized term that is used for “love”: “desiring one’s face so much” (source: Enggavoter 2004).

See also Seat of the Mind for traditional views of “ways of knowing, thinking, and feeling.”

favored one

The Greek that is traditionally translated in English as “favored one” is translated in Kafa as “God has looked at you with good eyes” (source: Loren Bliese) and in Mairasi as “Above-One (=God) constantly goes with you” (source: Enggavoter 2004).

shout like those who tread grapes

The phrase that is translated in English versions as “shout, like those who tread grapes” is translated into Afar as “Carbih gexa mari edde haa tirtirat heele.”: “He will make a war cry that men going to battle make.”

with all your heart

The Hebrew that is translated as “with all your heart” in many English versions is translated into Anuak as “with all your liver.”

For other translations using the term “liver” in Anuak see here and see Seat of the Mind for traditional views of “ways of knowing, thinking, and feeling.”

root producing poison

The metaphor that is rendered in English as “root producing poison” was replaced in Afar by an applicable idiom for corrupting people, “this disease will spread to you as well.”

orphaned

In Afar the phrase that is translated into English as “I will not leave you orphaned” is translated as abba akak rabe diidaale matakkaanay: “you will not become like bees whose father/leader has died.”

favor, kindness, loyal love

The Hebrew that is translated as “kindness / loyal love” or “(find) favor” in many English versions is translated into Anuak as “bland stomach.”

See also Seat of the Mind for traditional views of “ways of knowing, thinking, and feeling.”

under tongues are mischief and iniquity

The Hebrew that is rendered in English as “under their tongues are mischief and iniquity” is translated into Afar as afak keenik yawqe yab alliyo-bis le: “words that come from their mouth are like vomit.”

dissolute living, wild living

The Greek that is translated in English as “dissolute living” or “wild living” is translated in Kafa as “whatever his heart thought of.”

child, children

The Greek that is translated in English as “children” (in “a teacher of children”) is translated into Aari as “those who in their thoughts are like children.”

land flowing with milk and honey

The phrase that is rendered in English versions as “land flowing with milk and honey” is translated into Afar as niqmatak tan baaxoy buqre kee lacah meqehiyya: “a blessed land good for fields and cattle.” (Source: Loren Bliese)

In the interconfessional Nyanja translation (publ. 1999) it is translated with the existing proverb dziko lamwanaalirenji or “a land of what (type of food) can the child cry for?” (i.e. there is more than enough to eat). (Source: Ernst Wendland in The Bible Translator 1981, p. 107)