conscience

The Greek that is rendered in English as “conscience” is translated into Aari as “our thoughts speak to us,” in Nuer it is “the knowledge of their heart” (source: Jan Sterk), in Cheke Holo “to know what is straight and what is wrong” (source: Carl Gross), in Chokwe “law of the heart” (source D.B. Long in The Bible Translator 1953, p. 135ff.), and in Toraja-Sa’dan penaa ma’pakilala or “the admonishing within” (source: H. van der Veen in The Bible Translator 1950, p. 21 ff.).

See also conscience seared and perfect conscience / clear conscience, clear conscience towards God and all people, and brothers, up to this day I have lived my life with a clear conscience before God.

deep (noun)

The Hebrew that is translated as “(the) deep” in English is translated in Luba-Lulua as “a very deep hole in which there is water.”

God's anger, wrath of God

What is translated into English as “the wrath of God” (Good News Translation: “God’s anger”) has to be referred to in Bengali as judgment, punishment or whatever fits the context. In Bengali culture, anger is by definition bad and can never be predicated of God. (Source: David Clark)

In Kikuyu the whole phrase that is translated in English as “storing up wrath for yourself on the day of wrath” or similar is translated as “you are increasing for yourself God’s wrath.” (Source: Jan Sterk)

In Quetzaltepec Mixe it is translated with a term “that not only expresses anger, but also punishment.” (Source: Robert Bascom)

See also anger.

my country

The Hebrew that is translated as “my country” in English is translated in Luba-Lulua as “our country” (the phrase “my country” is reserved for chiefs and presidents).

promise

The Greek that is translated as “promise” in English is translated in Mbandja as “the thing which he said he would certainly give.”

uphold the law

The Greek that is translated in English as “uphold the law” is translated in Nuer as “make the law true.”

take a wife

The Hebrew that is translated in English as “(go) take (yourself) a wife” is translated in Meru as “go buy (marry) buy a prostitute.’ “In Meru, ‘buy’ is used for ‘marry.’ In churches, a new expression ‘take’ is gaining ground (being more respectful, it is thought). But the common way of referring to marriage is by using the verb ‘buy.'”

my Baal

The Hebrew that is translated as “My Baal” in English presented an “interesting problem in Meru: the pronoun concord on ‘my’ will indicate whether ‘Baal’ is a living being or not. It is either BAALI WAAKWA (Baal being a living being) or BAALI YAAKWA (Baal being a thing, an idol). But since one can hardly call God a non-living being, it was suggested to use WAAKWA.”