promise

The Greek that is translated as “promise” in English is translated in Mbandja as “the thing which he said he would certainly give.”

uphold the law

The Greek that is translated in English as “uphold the law” is translated in Nuer as “make the law true.”

take a wife

The Hebrew that is translated in English as “(go) take (yourself) a wife” is translated in Meru as “go buy (marry) buy a prostitute.’ “In Meru, ‘buy’ is used for ‘marry.’ In churches, a new expression ‘take’ is gaining ground (being more respectful, it is thought). But the common way of referring to marriage is by using the verb ‘buy.'”

baptized into Jesus Christ

The Greek that is translated in English as “baptized into Jesus Christ” is translated in Nuer as “in union with Jesus Christ.”

my Baal

The Hebrew that is translated as “My Baal” in English presented an “interesting problem in Meru: the pronoun concord on ‘my’ will indicate whether ‘Baal’ is a living being or not. It is either BAALI WAAKWA (Baal being a living being) or BAALI YAAKWA (Baal being a thing, an idol). But since one can hardly call God a non-living being, it was suggested to use WAAKWA.”

let there be light

The Hebrew that is translated as “(let there be) light” is translated in Sango as “let the weather become clear.” “Sango has no equivalent for ‘light.’ Light is indicated by its source (lamp, sun, fire), or by its effect: ‘everything becomes clear’ or ‘that which allows one to see clearly.'”

See also greater light / lesser light and light (metaphorical).

confirm

The Greek that is translated in English as “confirmed” is translated in Kuria as “completely fulfilled.”

complete verse (Ezek. 11:19), one heart

The translation of this verse in Taita is back-translated as: “I will make them of one mind, I will give them a new spirit, I will remove their heart of stone and give them an obeying heart” (Nani nichawibonya wikaie na nia imweri, na kungira roho mbishi andenyi kwawo. Nichainja ija ngolo ikurie sa igho ifume andenyi kwawo, nani nichawineka ngolo esikira).

Unlike the Hebrew text that uses the word leb (לֵ֣ב) (translated as “heart” in English) three times, the Taita translation uses “mind” in its first occurrence in this verse.