the wicked are snared in the work of their own hands

The Hebrew that is translated as something like “the wicked are snared in the work of their own hands” in English is rendered in Medumba as “the works of the hands of the wicked man throw him into the pit” (“‘To throw into the pit’ is a figure of speech for ‘betraying’, ‘condemning’, and the pit symbolizes a difficult situation from which there appears to be no way out.”)

Source: Jan de Waard in The Bible Translator 1969, p. 143ff.

throw filth on you

The Hebrew that is translated as “I will throw filth on you” in English (referring to the treatment of a prostitute) is rendered in Medumba with the existing expression “throw filth (ashes) at one’s back.” (“This is the way in which ‘children’ — but there is of course no age limit! — are punished by parents for having violated the existing order or some particular — sexual or non-sexual — taboo. However, at the same time, the expression ‘throw ashes at one’s back’ has entered the language in a figurative way, having the extended meaning of ‘making someone ridiculous.’ In fact, both components of punishment and making ridiculous are present here.”)

Source: Jan de Waard in The Bible Translator 1971, p. 146ff.

you have loosed my sackcloth

The Hebrew that is translated as “you have loosed my sackcloth” in English is rendered in the Bamileke language Medumba with the existing expression “you have taken the bag of mourning from my hand” (“because Bamileke women in mourning normally carry a raffia bag slung over the arm.”) (Source: Jan de Waard in The Bible Translator 1974, p. 107ff and Nida / Reyburn, p. 56)

See also sackcloth.

hold my lot

The Hebrew that is translated as “you hold my lot” or “you support my lot” in English is rendered in Medumba as “you guard the back of me,” “that is to say my posterior from my head to my heels. The predominant idea in this expression is one of protection, while continuing action is indicated by the verb ‘to keep.'”

Source: Jan de Waard in The Bible Translator 1969, p. 143ff.

cast my shoe, throw my shoe

The Hebrew that is often translated in English as “throw (or: cast) my shoe” (“symbolizing taking possession of the territory”) is translated into Bamun as “I plant my war spear (in the land of Edom)” (“In the Bamun culture occupation or possession is indicated by planting a spear in the enemy’s territory.”)

Source: Jan de Waard in The Bible Translator 1969, p. 143ff.