heal (from infertility)

The Hebrew that is translated as “heal” (from infertility) in English could not be translated directly in Western Lawa. “Barrenness and impotency are not understood as sickness in the Western Lawa culture. Thus the verb ‘heal’ could not be used. Therefore the last part of the verse was translated: ‘Abimelech was saved from what God had planned to do to him. God caused his wife and women slaves to be able to have children like before.'”

See also barren.

my firstborn, my might and the beginning of my strength

The Hebrew that is translated into English as something like “my firstborn, my might and the beginning of my strength” is translated into Western Lawa as “my first born, born when I was young and strong — like the first fruit of a tree.”

loves his life - hates his life

The Greek that is translated as “loves his life” and “hates his life” in English is translated into Maru (Lhao Vo) as “protecting one’s life for oneself” (for “loves his life”) and “not stingy with one’s life” (for “hates his own life”).

zeal

The Greek that is often translated in English as “zeal” is translated in Moken as “great love” (“my zeal” — cewui lak tho: “my great love.”) (Source: Gam Seng Shae)

In Ixcatlán Mazatec it is likewise translated in these verses as “love, commitment, enthusiasm” (not jealousy). (Source: Robert Bascom)

cover us

The Greek that is translated as “they will begin to say … to the hills, ‘Cover us.’” in English is translated into Pwo Eastern Karen as “they will beg … the cliffs, ‘Please cover us with landslide.'” (Just one verb in Pwo Eastern Karen to say “cover with landslide.”)

power (abstract noun)

Akha cannot directly translate the abstract noun “power” in what is translated into English as “you will see the Son of man seated at the right hand of Power,” it has to be the power of so and so. Thus the translation reads “the powerful God” here.