bottomless pit

The now commonly-used English idiom “bottomless pit” (for something that holds a very large amount of something) was first coined in 1526 in the English New Testament translation of William Tyndale (spelled as bottomlesse pytt) for the Greek abussos. (Source: Crystal 2010, p. 289)

For other idioms in English that were coined by Bible translation, see here.

woe is me

The now commonly-used English idiom “woe is me” (for an — often ironic — exclamation of lamentation for one’s misfortune) was first coined in 1610 in the Douay Rheims Version. (Source: Crystal 2010, p. 269)

For other idioms in English that were coined by Bible translation, see here.

See also Woe to us!

man cannot live by bread alone

The now commonly-used English idiom “man cannot live by bread alone” (meaning people need more than material things to truly live) was first coined in 1582 in the Douay Rheims Version (in the spelling Man shall not liue by bread alone). (Source: Crystal 2010, p. 275)

For other idioms in English that were coined by Bible translation, see here.

in the twinkling of an eye

The now commonly-used English idiom “in the twinkling of an eye” (meaning immediately) was first coined in 1382 in the English translation by John Wycliffe (in the spelling in the twynklyng of an iye). (Source: Crystal 2010, p. 290)

For other idioms in English that were coined by Bible translation, see here.

scapegoat

The now commonly-used English term “scapegoat” (meaning a person who is blamed for the wrongdoings, mistakes, or faults of others) was first coined in 1530 in the English Pentateuch translation of William Tyndale (in the spelling scapegoote). (Source: Crystal 2010, p. 278)

For other idioms in English that were coined by Bible translation, see here.

turned the world upside down

The now commonly-used English idiom “turned the world upside down” (for a drastic change in one’s outlook, circumstances, or way of life) was first coined in 1611 in the King James Version/Authorized Version (spelled as turned the world vpside downe) in Job 19:20. (Source: Crystal 2010, p. 266)

For other idioms in English that were coined by Bible translation, see here.

the signs of the times

The now commonly-used English idiom “the signs of the times” (meaning something that signifies the situation evident in the current times, often with a negative connotation) was first coined in 1526 in the English New Testament translation of William Tyndale (in the spelling ye signes of the tymes). (Source: Crystal 2010, p. 285)

For other idioms in English that were coined by Bible translation, see here.

be of good cheer

The now commonly-used English idiom “be of good cheer” (be happy) was first coined in 1526 in the English New Testament translation of William Tyndale. (Source: Crystal 2010, p. 275)

For other idioms in English that were coined by Bible translation, see here.

In Low German it is translated as Kopp hoch, lit. “hold your head up high” (translation by Johannes Jessen, publ. 1933, republ. 2006).

See also be cheered.