rejoice in hope

The Greek that is translated as “rejoice in hope” in English is translated into Cheke Holo as “rejoice always in what God has promised you.”

law of freedom, law of liberty

The Greek that is translated as “law of liberty” in English is translated in Owa as “the command that makes us free (=teaching that makes us clean from sin).”

having cleansed her by the washing of water with the word

The Greek that is translated into English with a variety of translations including “having cleansed her by the washing of water with the word” is translated into Varisi as “He (Jesus) washed it (the church) with the water of baptism and He (Jesus) declared it to be clean.”

justification, justify

The Greek that is translated as “justify” in English is translated into Tzotzil in two different ways. One of those is with Lec xij’ilatotic yu’un Dios ta sventa ti ta xc’ot ta o’ntonal ta xch’unel ti Jesucristoe (“we are seen well by God because of our faith in Jesus Christ”) (source: Aeilts, p. 118) and the other is “God sees as righteous” (source: Ellis Deibler in Notes on Translation July, 1967, p. 5ff.).

Other (back-) translations include:

judgment is without mercy

The Greek that is translated as “judgment is without mercy” in English is translated in Owa as “God will not have mercy.”

no dealings

The phrase that is translated in English translations as “for Jews have no dealings with Samaritans” (in the Good News Bible: “Jews will not use the same cups and bowls that Samaritans use”) into Mono Alu is translated as “It is taboo for you people to drink from our buckets.” (Source: Carl Gross)

In Telugu the more unspecific “have no dealings” rendering was used since even members of the same family do not use each other’s dishes. (Source: David Clark)

mercy

(To view the different translations of this term in a simplified graphical form on a new page, click or tap here.)

The Greek terms that are typically translated as “mercy” (or “compassion”) in English are translated in various ways. Bratcher / Nida classify them in (1) those based on the quality of heart, or other psychological center, (2) those which introduce the concept of weeping or extreme sorrow, (3) those which involve willingness to look upon and recognize the condition of others, or (4) those which involve a variety of intense feelings.

Here are some (back-) translations:

double-minded

The Greek that is translated as “double-minded” in English is translated in Owa as “double-hearted” (doubt; first one thought, then the opposite).

See also double-minded.