I say nothing about your owing me even your own self

The Greek that is translated in English as “I say nothing about your owing me even your own self” or similar is translated in Kinaray-A as “I will not mention your debt to me, because wasn’t it because of me that you obtained life without end?” The rhetorical question is used to soften the impact of the reminder that the person has an eternal debt (utang) to the writer. A person with such a debt is forever obligated to his benefactor almost as a slave to his master. So, a straightforward assertion would be a crude reminder to the debtor of his lowered status as being practically a slave to the writer. This might cause the person to feel he was being deliberately put to shame and thus caused to lose face. So, to avoid that, the writer softens the reminder with a rhetorical question. (Source: Balbina Abadiano in Notes on Translation 1988, p. 40ff.)

Elijah was a human being like us

The Greek that is translated as “Elijah was a human being like us” or similar in English is translated as “Do you remember the prophet Elijah formerly? He was a man just like us.” in Kinaray-A. The rhetorical question here functions as an introduction to a new theme which is about earnest prayer. Without the rhetorical question the translation would sound too abrupt. (Source: Balbina Abadiano in Notes on Translation 1988, p. 40ff.)

complete verse (Luke 4:10)

Following are a number of back-translations of Luke 4:10:

  • Noongar: “because the Bible says, ‘God will send his angels and they will save you’.” (Source: Warda-Kwabba Luke-Ang)
  • Uma: “Nothing will happen to you (sing.), because it is written in the Holy Book: ‘The Lord God orders his angels to protect you (sing.), so that you (sing.) do not come-to-harm/disaster.” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “for it is written in the holy-book it says, ‘He has commanded his angels to watch over/care for you so that nothing bad will happen to you.'” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “Because there is a written word of God which says, ‘God will cause His angels to help you,” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “because the written word of God says, ‘God will command his angels to take-care-of you (sing.).” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “For isn’t is so that it is written as-you-know, saying, ‘God will order his angels to take care of you,” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)
  • Kinaray-A: “Did not the Scripture say that ‘God will order his angels to watch over you’?” (Source: Balbina Abadiano in Notes on Translation 1988, p. 40ff.)

complete verse (Luke 13:14)

Following are a number of back-translations of Luke 13:14:

  • Noongar: “Now an official of the synagogue, he got angry because Jesus healed this woman on the Sabbath Day. So he told the people, ‘You can work six days; so come those days and get healed, but don’t come on the Sabbath Day!'” (Source: Warda-Kwabba Luke-Ang)
  • Uma: “From there, the leader of the house of prayer were angry, because Yesus had healed a person on Sabat Day. That is why he said saying to the people: ‘Six days are our working days. On those days, you may come here asking-to-be-healed, not on Sabat Day!'” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “But the leader of that prayer-house was very angry because Isa was healing on a day of-no-work. And he said to the people, ‘Six days of the week we (incl.) should work. Come here on those days to be healed, don’t on a day of-no-work.'” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “And the boss of the church, he was very angry because Jesus had treated her on the day of rest. And he said to the people, ‘We are allowed to work during six days of the week; if you want to be cured at that time, well and good. But don’t you have yourself cured today on the day of rest!'” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “Whereupon the leader of the church became-angry, because Jesus had healed that woman and it was the day that was for-resting. So then he said to the people, ‘Six days only are when-we ought -to-work. Those then are the days that you ought to come to get-medicined/healed, not the day for-resting.'” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “But the overseer of that worship-place got angry about why on the Day of Rest Jesus had healed a sick person. That’s why he said to the people, ‘Isn’t it so,’ he said, ‘that there are six days in which to do work? Well why don’t you come to be healed of illness on those days? Not the Day of Rest!'” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)
  • Kinaray-A: “The leader of the house for gathering became angry because Jesus was healing on the Day of Rest. Therefore, this leader said to the people, ‘In one week aren’t there six days for us to work? You come here during those days and be healed, not on the Day of Rest!'” (Source: Balbina Abadiano in Notes on Translation 1988, p. 40ff.)

complete verse (Luke 19:7)

Following are a number of back-translations of Luke 19:7:

  • Noongar: “All the people watching, they began talking angrily. ‘This one Jesus is going to sit and to eat in the house of a bad man!'” (Source: Warda-Kwabba Luke-Ang)
  • Uma: “When the people saw that Yesus went to the house of Zakheus, they murmured/complained, they said: ‘Ii, why in the world is he visiting in the house of a sinner(emphatic)!'” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “When the people heard what Isa said to Sakkiyas, they grumbled, they said, ‘Na, why dang (exclamation) does he go along to the house of that sinful person?'” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “And when the people heard these words of Jesus to Zacchaeus, they didn’t like it and they spoke to each other, ‘Why is Jesus going to go up into the house of a person who really transgresses against God?'” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “But all those who saw, they murmured/grumbled saying, ‘Why (rebuke particle) does he have-himself-welcomed in the house of that sinner?'” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “Without anything further, as for all who saw that, they talked-among-themselves saying, ‘Expl., he goes to stay with one who is sinful!'” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)
  • Kinaray-A: “When the people saw that Jesus was going into the house of Zaqueo, they grumbled and said, ‘Why is he going into the house of that man who is a sinner?'” (Source: Balbina Abadiano in Notes on Translation 1988, p. 40ff.)

complete verse (James 2:21)

Following are a number of back-translations of James 2:21:

  • Uma: “Remember the account of Abraham: God received him, he made him straight in his sight because of his behavior, for Abraham offered his son Ishak to God on the altar [lit., worship/offering burning rock].” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “Even Ibrahim our (incl.) forefather was reckoned straight/righteous by God because he did what God commanded him. He hep handed-over/offered-up to God his son Isahak there on the stone for sacrificing.” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “What was the way that our ancestor Abraham showed that God regarded him as righteous? It was his acts in obeying what God commanded him when he asked him to offer his son Isaac in sacrifice.” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “Please remember Abraham our ancestor long ago. God counted/considered that he was righteous because of his obeying him when he laid-his son Isaac -on-top-of the altar in order to offer him to God.” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “For think about Abraham who is our ancestor. Isn’t it so that he was regarded by God as righteous/straight because of what he did, when he obeyed what was said that he was to give God his son Isaac making (him) a worship-offering which is burned on the burning-place?” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)
  • Tenango Otomi: “Our ancestor Abraham did what God told him and therefore he was acquitted from sin. Because he offered to kill his son to make a sacrifice to God.” (Source: Tenango Otomi Back Translation)
  • Kinaray-A: “Do you remember our ancestor Abraham? Wasn’t he at the point of killing his son Isaac on the altar as proof of his obeying the command of God? And because of this God counted him righteous.” (“The two rhetorical questions here, function as reminders of known facts. The first establishes the theme and the second makes a strong assertion in a polite way-striving not to offend the hearers.” — Source: Balbina Abadiano in Notes on Translation 1988, p. 40ff.)