they did not understand about the loaves

The Greek that is translates as “they did not understand about the loaves” or similar in English is translated in the4 following ways:

  • Tzotzil: “They did not understand his power even after seeing the bread multiplied
  • Teutila Cuicatec: “For they did not yet clearly understand that Jesus could do anything, even though they saw that he caused the bread to become enough for all those people who had gathered”
  • Western Highland Chatino: “They weren’t aware that Jesus had so much power, even though he had fed so many people with only five loaves.”
  • Ocotlán Zapotec: “Not even with the miracle of the bread that Jesus performed did they understand who he was.” (Source for all above: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)

cast out demons in ones name

The Greek that is translated as “cast out demons in your (or: my) name” is translated in Ocotlán Zapotec as “said your name to cast out demons.” (Source: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)

cornerstone

Bawm build with bamboo and thatch in their mountainous forests. They made the apostles and prophets become the roof ridge pole and Jesus the central uprights which support it. I asked why not the corner uprights since Greek has a term that is translated in English as ‘cornerstone.’ Bawm translators responded that the central uprights are more important than the corner ones, and Greek refers to the most important stone. (“Corner uprights” used in 1Tim 3:15.) (Source: David Clark)

In Mono, translators used “main post,” in Martu Wangka “two forked sticks with another long strong stick laid across” (see also 1 Peter 2:6-7.), and in Arrernte, the translation in 1Pet 2:7 (in English translation: “the stone . . . became the very cornerstone”) was rendered as “the foundation… continues to be the right foundation.” (Source for this and two above: Carl Gross)

Likewise, in Uripiv it also is the “post” (source: Ross McKerras) as well as in Sabaot (source Jim Leonhard in Holzhausen / Riderer 2010, p. 50)

In Ixcatlán Mazatec it is translated with a term denoting the “the principal part of the ‘house’ (or work)” (Source: Robert Bascom), in Enlhet as “like the house-root” (source: Jacob Loewen in The Bible Translator 1969, p. 24ff.), in Q’anjob’al it is translated with with the existing idiom “ear of the house.” (Source: Newberry and Kittie Cox in The Bible Translator 1950, p. 91ff.), in Desano as “main support of the house,” and in Tataltepec Chatino as “the best stone” (source for this and one above: Viola Waterhouse in Notes on Translation August 1966, p. 86ff.).

Shuar translates as “that stone was placed to the main house pole.” The Shuar use stones in house building either at the bottom of the posthole as a base for the house pole to rest on, or as chocking material around the post to hold it firm. Either function is acceptable here particularly as applied to the main house-pole. In Ocotlán Zapotec it is “master stone of the house.” This is a special stone they put into the foundation as sort of a guide stone of how the foundation is to true up. (Source: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)

See also rock / stone, foundation on rock, and foundation.

desert, wilderness

The Greek that is translated as “desert” or “wilderness” in English is translated as “a place where noisiness is cut off (or: stops)” in Mairasi, “big barren-field” (pandaso bhalano) in Muna, “uninhabited place” in Wantoat, “where no people dwell” in Umiray Dumaget Agta, “where no house is” (Shipibo-Conibo), “barren field” (Balinese), “large empty place” (Ocotlán Zapotec)´, and in Pa’o Karen as “jungle” (denoting a placer without any towns, villages and tilled fields).

Sources: Mairasi: Enggavoter 2004; Muna: René van den Berg; Wantoat: Holzhausen 1991, p. 38; Umiray Dumaget Agta: Larson 1998, p. 98; Shipibo-Conibo: James Lauriault in The Bible Translator 1951, p. 32ff.; Balinese: J.L. Swellengrebel in The Bible Translator 1950 p. 75ff.; Ocotlán Zapotec: (B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.; Pa’o Karen: Gordon Luce in The Bible Translator 1950, p. 153f.

See also wilderness and desolate wilderness.

complete verse (Mark 3:11)

Following are a number of back-translations of Mark 3:11:

  • Uma: “People who were possessed by evil spirits came too. When they saw Yesus, immediately knelt down in front of him, and shouted, they said: ‘You are the Child of God!'” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “And whenever he was seen by people possessed by demons, they threw (themselves) down before him and shouted/screamed, they said, ‘You are the Son of God.'” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “And as for the demons, when they saw Jesus they knelt down before him crying out saying, ‘You really are the Son of God!'” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “The people also who were possessed by evil-spirits, when they were seeing Jesus, they were kneeling face-down before him while-simultaneously also the evil-spirits were making-them-scream, saying, ‘You (sing.) are the Child of God!'” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “Each one who was possessed by an evil spirit who saw him, he went down prone in front of him. They were being caused by those evil spirits to cry out, saying, ‘You are the one who is the Son of God!'” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)
  • Ocotlán Zapotec: “Those who had demons in their hearts knelt down before him and the demons cried out: ‘You are the only Son of God.'” (Source: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)

complete verse (Mark 4:24)

Following are a number of back-translations of Mark 4:24:

  • Uma: “Yesus said further: ‘Really pay attention to what you are hearing here. For the more of God’s Word that you share/divide with others, the more also God will explain to you–or even more than that.” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “Isa said also, ‘Pay very good attention to whatever you hear. For if your paying-attention is good, what you get/receive will also be good and you will receive/get more.” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “And Jesus spoke again, ‘Carefully listen to my teaching, for according to how you carefully listen, God will give you understanding, however, he will cause you to understand much more.” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “Then Jesus continued, saying, ‘Be-diligent then in listening to what I am saying, because if you do that, you will also understand much, and there will be moreover that which God will add to your understanding.” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “Jesus added on, saying, ‘It’s necessary that you try-to-understand well this teaching of mine which you are hearing. For whatever your judgment/decision is, to follow/obey well or just to disregard it, that’s what God will use to judge you, or much more.” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)
  • Tsafiki: “… If you give a little bit of hearing you will get a little bit of knowledge. If you give good hearing, you will get lots of knowledge. God will cause those who listen well to learn even more.”
  • Ocotlán Zapotec: “… If you hear well, you will benefit well, and God will cause you to hear more.” (Source for this and one above: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)

complete verse (Mark 8:35)

Following are a number of back-translations of Mark 8:35:

  • Uma: “Who[ever] hangs-on-to his own desires, he won’t get good life. But who[ever] releases his own desires because he is following me and because of the Good News, even if it means his death, he is the one who will get good life.” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “For,’ said Isa, ‘if a person cherishes his life, he has no everlasting life. But if a person does not cherish his life and submits yet to die because of his persevering in following me and proclaiming the good news, na, that person has everlasting life.” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “For if there is a person who sets his heart on his life, he will die just the same. But if there is a person who follows me and spreads the good news even though it leads to his death, God will give him back his life and he will no longer die again forever.” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “Because the one who esteems/considers-important himself, he will die just the same, but the one who dies on account of his faith in me and his preaching of the good news, there is life that has no end that God will give to him.” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “For the one who really values his life, it will indeed be lost to him. But the one who holds-fast to me and the spreading of the Good News even though it may cause his life/breath to be severed, life which is far-from-ordinary will really be his.” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)
  • Tlahuitoltepec Mixe: “Whoever restrains himself, whoever will not let himself do (that is, protects himself) for my sake, his soul will go to ruin; and whoever with all his heart offers himself, who does not pity himself for my sake and for the good word’s sake, his soul will go to be saved.”
  • Ocotlán Zapotec: “He who does not want to die for me, will die, but he who loses his life for me and for the words of the gospel will live forever, will be saved.” (Source for this and above: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)

complete verse (Mark 12:27)

Following are a number of back-translations of Mark 12:27:

  • Uma: “So, from those words of God, we clearly know that Abraham, Ishak and Yakub were alive. For it is not people who are dead who worship God, it is people who live who worship him. How wrong that thinking of yours is.'” (Source: Uma Back Translation)
  • Yakan: “God is God of the living not God of the dead. (That means that even though Ibrahim and Isahak and Yakub have died long-ago, they live there in heaven because they still worship God.) You are really mistaken/at-fault in your thinking.'” (Source: Yakan Back Translation)
  • Western Bukidnon Manobo: “which is to say, they were still worshipping God for the one who worships him, even if he dies, he still has life. That’s why you are very much mistaken.” (Source: Western Bukidnon Manobo Back Translation)
  • Kankanaey: “What this means to say is that the dead live again, because God, he is not the God of dead people but rather the living. Therefore it is true that you are thoroughly mistaken.'” (Source: Kankanaey Back Translation)
  • Tagbanwa: “Of course he is not the God of people who are dead but on the contrary, alive. Therein it’s clear that Abraham and company (i.e. Isaac and Jacob) are alive again even though they had already died. Your understanding really is very wrong.'” (Source: Tagbanwa Back Translation)
  • Mezquital Otomi: “Because God says he is the God of those three men who have died, we all know that they still live and worship him. …”
  • Tzotzil: “Well then, I say to you, even though the forefathers of Moses are dead people, God spoke about them as if they were living people. Therefore you should know they are still living because God spoke thus. …”
  • Ocotlán Zapotec: “If God is God of Jacob, Isaac, and Abraham, he is God of those who are alive, even though they have died. …”
  • Quiotepec Chinantec: “God is the God of the living. He is also the God of the dead because they are not dead to Him, they also are living.”
  • Ocotlán Zapotec: “If God is God of Jacob, Isaac, and Abraham, he is God of those who are alive, even though they have died.” (Source for this and four above: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)