faint from fear

The Greek that is translated in some English versions as “people will faint from fear” in rendered in Kalmyk as “people’s hearts will be in their heels.”

colt that has never been ridden

The phrase that is translated into English as “a colt that has never been ridden” can be translated in Kalmyk much more succinctly than even the original Greek text since Kalmyk has a specific word for an unbroken colt. (source: David Clark)

In the Arhuaco translation of Luke 19:35 (in the English translation: “after throwing their cloaks on the colt, they set Jesus on it.”) the co-translator knew how unruly unbroken colts are so they translated “they held the donkey steady so that Jesus could get on it.” (source: Paul Lundquist in The Bible Translator 1992, p. 246.)

hate

In Chechen there is no word for the term that is translated with “hate” in English that is appropriate to this context so the sentence has to be restructured to say, “if anyone does not esteem me more than…”.

This is also the case in Kalmyk where the sentence has to be restructured to say, “if anyone does not love me more than…”.

See also who hate us.