glorify God

The Greek that is translated as “glorify God” in English is rendered as “to wake God up” in Guerrero Amuzgo.

Other translations are “say that God is very great” (Central Tarahumara), “how good God is, they said” (Tzotzil), “to speak about God as good” (Tzeltal), “to give God a great name” (Highland Puebla Nahuatl), “to give God highness” (Kipsigis), “to take God out high” (in the sense of “to exalt”) (Huautla Mazatec), “to make great, to exalt” (Toraja-Sa’dan, Javanese), “to lift up God’s brightness” (Kpelle), “to show God to be great” (Central Pame), “to make God shine” (Wayuu), “to make God’s name big” (Huastec), “to make God important” (Isthmus Zapotec) (source for this and above: Bratcher / Nida), or “say to God: You are of good heart” (Huichol) (source: Nida 1964, p. 228).

In Waama this is translated as “make God’s name big.” (For the translation into Waama, five categories of verb doxazo and the noun doxa were found that were all translated differently, see glorify (reveal God’s or Jesus’ glory to people)).

In Shipibo-Conibo it is translated as “to brag about God” (“This may strike some at first as being an unspiritual approach, but it surely is Pauline, for Paul used the word ‘to brag’ when he declared his confidence in Jesus Christ and in the salvation of the world which God wrought through His Son.”) (Source: Nida 1952, p. 162)

glory (of God)

For the translation of the Greek that is translated into English as “glory” or “glorify” into Waama, five categories were found that were all translated differently. (See also raised to glory, glorify (God’s name), glorify (reveal God’s or Jesus’ glory to people), glory (honor, raise, approval).)

“For the first group, the ‘glory, greatness, uniqueness of God or Jesus,’ we used a term meaning ‘greatness, bigness.’ In some contexts it seemed better to replace the simple noun by ‘the fact that God is great.’ So, ‘we saw his glory’ in John 1:14 is rendered as ‘we saw what his greatness is like.’

(Source: Kathrin Brückner in Notes on Translation 2/1988, p. 41-46).

glorify (reveal God's glory to people)

For the translation of the Greek that is translated into English as “glory” or “glorify” into Waama, five categories were found that were all translated differently. (See also raised to glory, glorify (God’s name), glory (honor, raise, approval), glory (of God or Jesus).)

“One group relates to the Greek verb that means ‘to show, make known or reveal God’s glory to people.’ The word ‘glory’ here retains the same sense described in the first group. (See glory (of God or Jesus))

“[Here] we used the expressions ‘show (the Father’s) greatness,’ ’cause the people to recognize that God is great,” “make his greatness obvious, apparent.’

“John 14:13, for example, ‘that the Father may be glorified,’ is rendered as ‘so that I can show the people the greatness of my Father.’ On one occasion (John 17:10 ‘I am glorified in them’), we used
‘because of them people saw my greatness.’

  • John 14:13 ‘Whatever you ask in my name, I will do it, that the Father may be glorified.’
  • John 17:1 ‘Father, … glorify thy Son that the Son may glorify thee.’

“Other occurrences: John 11:4, 12:23, 13:31-32 (5), 15:8, 17:4-5 (2), 17:10.”

(Source: Kathrin Brückner in Notes on Translation 2/1988, p. 41-46).

glorify (God's name)

For the translation of the Greek that is translated into English as “glory” or “glorify” into Waama, five categories were found that were all translated differently. (See also raised to glory, glory (honor, raise, approval), glorify (reveal God’s glory to people), glory (of God).)

For the term that is translated into English as “glorify your name” “we translated by ‘make God’s name big.’ Names in Waama are more than just labels. They represent the essence of the person. Thus, making somebody’s name big means acknowledging his importance.”

(Source: Kathrin Brückner in Notes on Translation 2/1988, p. 41-46).

raised to glory

For the translation of the Greek that is translated into English as “glory” or “glorify” into Waama, five categories were found that were all translated differently. (See also glory (honor, raise, approval), glorify (God’s name), glorify (reveal God’s glory to people), glory (of God).)

In the group that is translated into English as “being raised to glory,” “we used two similar terms. John 7:39 we rendered as ‘Jesus had not yet gone up to a high place.’ John 12:16 became “When Jesus returned to his Father and his greatness became obvious, they remembered…”

(Source: Kathrin Brückner in Notes on Translation 2/1988, p. 41-46).

glory, honor

For the translation of the Greek that is translated into English as “glory” or “glorify” in Waama, five categories were found that were all translated differently. (See also raised to glory, glorify (God’s name), glorify (reveal God’s glory to people), glory (of God).)

For the occurrences where “‘glory’ can be replaced by ‘honor,’ ‘raise,’ or ‘approval,’ something that one can give to men or to God or receive from them. Thus in this context glory does not refer to the greatness and honorability itself but rather to the recognition or acknowledgement of such honorability. The honorability is already there (or is at least purported to be). In Waama we always had to express the idea by verbs like ‘praise,’ ‘appreciate’ (if man does it as opposed to God), and the expression “make somebody’s name big.”)

(Source: Kathrin Brückner in Notes on Translation 2/1988, p. 41-46).

See also glorify God.

brotherly love

The Greek that is translated in English as “brotherly love” (also: “mutual love” and others) is translated in Waama as “love each other as children of the same mother.” Like many languages, Waama has no generic term for “brother” and sister, just “older brother” or “younger brother.” At first, “love each other as children of the same father” seemed to fit but since the Waama live in a polygamous society, brothers of the same father with different mothers often don’t get along unlike maternal siblings. (Source: Kathrin Pope in Holzhausen / Riderer 2010, p. 54)