old (commandment)

The Greek that is translated as “old (commandment)” in English is translated in Quetzaltepec Mixe as “this is not the first time this commandment has been told to you…” because “old” has the connotation of “obsolete.”

scold

The Greek that is often translated as “scolded her” in English is translated in Quetzaltepec Mixe as “scolded her directly to her face.”

blindfold

The Greek that is translated as “blindfold” in English cannot be translated in some languages without specifying the object that the blindfolding is done with. In Quetzaltepec Mixe it says “blindfold him with a cloth.”

bind (him)

The Greek that is translated as “bind” or “bound” in English cannot be translated in some languages without specifying what is bound. In Quetzaltepec Mixe it says “bound him by the hands.”

swear (promise)

The Hebrew that is translated as “swear” in English versions has been rendered in Quetzaltepec Mixe as “promise me using the name of God.”

what each should take

The Greek that is typically translated as “what each should take” is translated in Quetzaltepec Mixe as “what each one that won would take” (assuming there were more soldiers than garments).

God's anger, wrath of God

What is translated into English as “the wrath of God” (Good News Translation: “God’s anger”) has to be referred to in Bengali as judgment, punishment or whatever fits the context. In Bengali culture, anger is by definition bad and can never be predicated of God. (Source: David Clark)

In Kikuyu the whole phrase that is translated in English as “storing up wrath for yourself on the day of wrath” or similar is translated as “you are increasing for yourself God’s wrath.” (Source: Jan Sterk)

In Quetzaltepec Mixe it is translated with a term “that not only expresses anger, but also punishment.” (Source: Robert Bascom)

See also anger.

passed through

The Greek that is translated in English as “passed through (the midst of them)” needs to be translated in greater detail in some languages, including Quetzaltepec Mixe, because it needs to be specified that Jesus first needed to free himself before he could “pass through the midst of them.”

amazed, astonished, marvel

The Greek that is translated as “astonished” or “amazed” or “marvel” in English is translated in Pwo Karen as “stand up very tall.” (In John 5:20, source: David Clark)

Elsewhere it is translated as “confusing the inside of the head” (Mende), “shiver in the liver” (Uduk, Laka), “to lose one’s heart” (Mískito, Tzotzil), “to shake” (Southern Bobo Madaré), “to be with mouth open” (Panao Huánuco Quechua) (source: Bratcher / Nida), “to stand with your mouth open” (Citak) (source: Stringer 2007, p. 120), “ceasing to think with the heart” (Bulu), or “surprise in the heart” (Yamba) (source for this and one above: W. Reyburn in The Bible Translator 1959, p. 1ff.).

In Mark 5:20 and elsewhere where the astonishment is a response to listening to Jesus, the translation is “listened quietly” in Central Tarahumara, “they forgot listening” (because they were so absorbed in what they heard that they forgot everything else) in San Miguel El Grande Mixtec, “it was considered very strange by them” in Tzeltal (source: Bratcher / Nida), “in glad amazement” (to distinguish it from other kinds of amazement) (Quetzaltepec Mixe) (source: Robert Bascom), or “breath evaporated” (Mairasi) (source: Enngavoter 2004).

stand over

The Greek that is translated as “stood over her” is translated in Quetzaltepec Mixe as “approached her” since leaning over her would be culturally inappropriate.

gods

The Hebrew and Aramaic that is translated as “gods” in English is translated into Pass Valley Yali as ap enehime fanowon — “the good spirits (of the deceased one).” (Source: Daud Soesilo)

The Greek in 1 Corinthians is translated in Quetzaltepec Mixe similarly with a term that makes clear that these are good or bad spirits, not gods which can be compared to God. (Source: Robert Bascom)

kingdoms of the world

The Greek that is translated as “kingdoms of the world” is translated in Quetzaltepec Mixe with a phrases denoting “rich empires” rather than a collection of all the ethnic groups.