affection

The Greek that is often translated as “affection” in English is translated in Huba as “with one stomach.” This is a close match to the Greek original which uses splagchnon, the “inward part” or “bowels” to express the concept of affection. The English King James Version / Authorised Version translates here as “bowels.” (Source: David Frank in this blog post).

See also Seat of the Mind / Seat of Emotions and maintain constant love for one another / love each other deeply.

love does not keep a record of wrong, love is not resentful

The Greek that is translated in English as “love does not keep a record of wrong” or “love is not resentful” is translated in Huba as Nyida do gǝzǝ ndǝ nya ta wa: “Love does not hold someone in the mouth of the stomach.” (Source: David Frank in this blog post)

distress, sorrow

The Greek that is translated in English as “painful (visit)” or “(come to you) with sorrow” is translated in Huba as “I didn’t want to cut the insides of you.” David Frank explains: “Huba has just one expression that covers both ‘angry’ and ‘sad.’ They don’t make a distinction in their language. I suppose you could say that the term they use means more generically, ‘strong emotional reaction.’ (Source: David Frank in this blog post)

love each other deeply, maintain constant love for one another

The Greek that is translated in English as “maintain constant love for one another” or “love each other deeply” or similar is translated in Huba as “love each other with one stomach.” (Source: David Frank in this blog post)

See also Seat of the Mind / Seat of Emotions.

complete verse (2Cor. 7:6)

This verse is translated in Huba as “But God who puts the heart [=comforts] those with heart kill self [=who have no hope] put our heart [=comforted us] with the coming of Titus.” (Source: David Frank in this blog post)

See also Seat of the Mind / Seat of Emotions and open heart / heart opened.