affection

The Greek that is often translated as “affection” in English is translated in Huba as “with one stomach.” This is a close match to the Greek original which uses splagchnon, the “inward part” or “bowels” to express the concept of affection. The English King James Version / Authorised Version translates here as “bowels.” (Source: David Frank in this blog post).

See also Seat of the Mind / Seat of Emotions and maintain constant love for one another / love each other deeply.

knowledge puffs up

The Greek that is translated in English as “knowledge puffs up” or “knowledge makes arrogant” is translated in Huba as “knowledge comes with bringing head.” (Source: David Frank in this blog post)

instruct, warn

The Greek that is translated in English as “to instruct (us)” or “to warn us” is translated in Huba as “so that our ears would be pulled.” (Source: David Frank in this blog post)

sorrow

The Greek that is translated in English as “painful” or “sorrow” is translated in Huba as “cut the insides.” David Frank explains: “Huba has just one expression that covers both ‘angry’ and ‘sad.’ They don’t make a distinction in their language. I suppose you could say that the term they use means more generically, ‘strong emotional reaction.’ (Source: David Frank in this blog post)

In Enlhet it is translated as “going aside of the innermost.” “Innermost” or valhoc is a term that is frequently used in Enlhet to describe a large variety of emotions or states of mind (for other examples see here). (Source: Jacob Loewen in The Bible Translator 1969, p. 24ff.)

obedience

The Greek that is translated in English as “obedience” is translated in Huba as hya nǝu nyacha: “follow (his) mouth.” (Source: David Frank in this blog post)

linen

The Greek that is translated in English as “fine linen, white and pure” is translated in Huba as “good, clean, white clothes,” the closest corresponding term in Huba. (Source: David Frank in this blog post).

fellowship

The Greek that is translated in English as “fellowship” or “communion” is translated in Huba as daɓǝkǝr: “joining heads.” (Source: David Frank in this blog post)