spit upon

The Greek that is translated in English as “spit” is translated in Chipaya as “eject saliva” (source: Ronald D. Olson in Notes on Translation January, 1968, p. 15ff.).

In Nyongar it is narridja-kwarda or “spittle-throw” (source: Warda-Kwabba Luke-Ang).

See also spit and touched.

goes out into the sewer

The Greek that is translated as “goes out into the sewer” is translated in Kuku-Yalanji as “doesn’t stay there” and in Chipaya as “it goes to the outside.” (Source: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)

deny oneself

(To view the different translations of this term in a simplified graphical form on a new page, click or tap here.)

The Greek that is translated with “deny himself” or deny oneself” is according to Bratcher / Nida “without doubt one of the most difficult expressions in all of Mark to translate adequately.” These are many of the (back-) translations:

take up their cross

The Greek that is translated as “take up their cross” in English is translated in Galela as “let go of each of their desires in their hearts” (source: Howard Shelden in Kroneman 2004, p. 501).

In Korku it is translated as “take up trouble for me to the extent that he would be ready to give his life on the cross for me,” and in Chipaya as “be ready to suffer, even die.” (Source: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)