cast down

The Hebrew phrase that is rendered in English versions as “why are you cast down, O my soul” is translated into Bukusu as “my heart is heavy.” This indicates deep sorrow and trouble.

father, grandfather

The Hebrew phrase that is translated in English as “of Abraham, your father” is translated into Bukusu as “Abraham your grandfather.” In many languages this is a more correct way of expressing the relation between Abraham and Jacob.

See also son vs. grandson.

Judges

The Hebrew term that is translated in English translations as “Judges” (as the title of the biblical book) of “judges” (in Judg 2:16 and 2:17) is translated into Bukusu as “leaders” (in the case of the title of the book ‘The book of Leaders’). In light of this, there is no real need to explain that these persons were not judges of a court of law, but leaders.

our life for yours

The Hebrew that is rendered in English versions as “our life for yours!” (meaning “if you let us live, we’ll let you live”) is translated into Bukusu as “our lives are on you, and your life is on us.”

palace

The Hebrew that is rendered into English as “palace” is translated into Bukusu as “the house of the big chief.”

wearing a crown

The Hebrew that is rendered in English as “(bring Queen Vashti…) with her royal crown” was first translated into Bukusu as “wearing a crown,” but this appears to suggest that she did not wear anything else. Changed to: “She was well dressed, wearing her crown.”

living God

The Hebrew that is rendered in English as “the living God” is translated into Bukusu as “God who is there.” In the Bukusu culture it is impossible to talk about a “living God.” That would make a mockery of God. The expression “the God who is there” is a confession of the fact that he is active and present.