Is a lamp brought in to be put under the bushel basket (...) and not on the lampstand?

The Greek that is transated as “Is a lamp brought in to be put under the bushel basket (…) and not on the lampstand?” or similar in English is translated in Bahnar as “Do I ever bring in a lamp…? Don’t I put it on a lamp stand?” because in Bahnar illustrative metaphors occur in first person singular. (Source: Larson 1998, p. 250)

In Seri, the first part is translated as “A lamp is not lighted and … placed under an inverted basket.” Here, the implication that the lamp is lit had to be made explicit, as did the fact that the basket was inverted before placing it over the lamp. (Source: B. Moore / G. Turner in Notes on Translation 1967, p. 1ff.)

camel

The Greek that is translated in English as “camel” is translated in Muna as “water buffalo.” René van den Berg explains: “Camels are unknown; the biggest known animal is the water buffalo (though now rare on Muna).”

In Bislama is is translated as buluk: “cow” / “bull” (source: Ross McKerras) and in Bahnar as aseh lăk-đa which is a combination of the Vietnamese loan word for “camel” (lăk-đa) and the Bahnar term for “horse” (aseh) to communicate that the camel is a beast of burden (source: Pham Xuan Tin in The Bible Translator 1952, p. 20ff.).

In Nyongar it is translated as “cangaroo” (source: Warda-Kwabba Luke-Ang).