shake heads

The phrase that is translated in English translations as “are horrified and shake their heads” is translated into Afar as Ahamal qagabsiteloonuuh, namma xabanal gaba hayya heenih.: “They are shocked at this, and put both hands on their cheeks.” (Shock is expressed physically by placing their hands on their cheeks, not shaking their heads.)

See also insulted him and shook their heads.

act, do

The Hebrew that is translated in English versions as “I will do (this)” is translated into Afar as “gaba qidu waa”: “I will throw (my) hand.”

die

The Hebrew which is translated into English as “Jehoshaphat died” or “Jehoshaphat slept” was translated into Afar as Yacoosafatal amri yemeeteh: “The command came on Jehoshaphat.” (“God” understood in the view that death comes because of a divine command.)

overthrown, trip up

The phrase that is translated into English translations as “let them be tripped up (or overthrown) before you” is translated into Afar as Isik foocal irimbi selte caxa ken ab.: Make them wood that has been eaten by termites before you.” (Termites are a big problem destroying wood in the Afar region.)

stranger

The Hebrew that has been translated in some English versions as “stranger” is translated into Afar as “non-relative.”

a man against his father and a daughter against her mother

In Afar the Greek that is translated into English as “a man against his father, and a daughter against her mother” is translated as lab-baxa kay abbah fillat, say-baxa tet inah fillat . . . umaaneh tittin amot haa’gida: “that a male child place on his father’s neck, (and) a female child on her mother’s neck . . . together on their heads for evil.” (Accusation is placing evil on the neck or head of the person.)

person

The Hebrew that is rendered in English versions as “I’m not the kind of person that runs and hides” or “Should a man like me run away?” was translated into Afar as Kudaah ambooqorem, yi migaq hinna.: “My name is not fleeing and hiding.” (One’s character is one’s name in Afar idiom.)

height was like the height of cedars and was strong as oaks

The Hebrew that is translated in English as “height was like the height of cedars and was strong as oaks” is translated in Afar as xexxaarah calawwayti gide yakkeeh caylah lubak inna luk yenehiyya: “the length of (hemispherical) house poles and strength as lions.” (Afar portable houses have frames of thin poles up to nine feet long bent over the top. These poles are covered with mats and are broken down and loaded on camels when they migrate to areas where there is grass for their animals.)

tingle

The phrase that is rendered in English versions as “the ears of everyone who hears of it (disaster) will tingle” is translated into Afar as “yaabbe marih xagarak xoq qiddahiyya”: “(disaster) that will make the bodies of the people who hear it perspire.” (A different bodily reaction associated with frightening news in Afar idiom.)

before the LORD

The Hebrew that is translated in English as “before the Lord” has been translated into Afar as “in the place where God is worshiped” to avoid the suggestion of a physical representation of God.

See also avoidance of anthropomorphisms.

motion to

In Afar the term that is translated into English as “motion to” is translated as minin cassa heeh: “signal with eyebrow.”

See also motion (to speak).