heart (conscience) hurt

The Hebrew that is translated as “heart (conscience) hurt” in many English versions is translated into Anuak as “liver fell.”

For other translations using the term “liver” in Anuak see here and see Seat of the Mind for traditional views …

heart fail

The Hebrew that is translated as “heart fail” in many English versions is translated into Anuak as “liver be startled (or: panicked).”

For other translations using the term “liver” in Anuak see here and see Seat of the Mind for …

strong man

The Hebrew that is translated as “strong (mighty) man” in many English versions is translated into Anuak as “liver is strong” (i.e., “fearless”).

For other translations using the term “liver” in Anuak see here and see Seat of the Mind

here I am with you according to your desire

The Hebrew that is translated as “here I am with you according to your desire” in some English versions is translated into Anuak as “whatever is in your liver I will do.”

For other translations using the term “liver” in …

turned aside after gain

The Hebrew that is translated as “turned aside after gain” in many English versions is translated into Anuak as “livers became big for things.”

For other translations using the term “liver” in Anuak see here and see Seat of the

with all your heart

The Hebrew that is translated as “with all your heart” in many English versions is translated into Anuak as “with all your liver.”

For other translations using the term “liver” in Anuak see here and see Seat of the Mind

clothes torn

The Hebrew that is often translated in English as “with his clothes torn” is translated in Anuak with the addition “that shows his fallen liver” (i.e., grief, sadness)

For other translations using the term “liver” in Anuak see here and …

ears will tingle

The Hebrew that is often translated in English as “ears (of everyone who hears it) will tingle” is translated in Anuak as “liver (…) will startle.”

For other translations using the term “liver” in Anuak see here and see Seat

repent / repentance

(To view the different translations of this term in a simplified graphical form on a new page, click or tap here.)

The Greek and Hebrew that is often translated as “repent” or “repentance” is (back-) translated in various ways:

harden heart

The Hebrew that is translated into English as forms of “(to not) harden heart” is translated into other languages with their own vivid idioms; for example, Thai uses “black-hearted” (source: Bratcher / Hattoon, p. 272), Pökoot as makany kwoghïghitu mötöwekwo